5 Signs Your Crane May Need an Equipment Repair

Are you having problems with your crane?

In the construction business, maintaining your equipment is always a top priority. It ensures adherence to safety regulations within your facility. One piece of equipment that plays a crucial role in industrial jobs is cranes.

Cranes serve as large equipment that carries a large quantity of material at a time. It needs inspections every 12 months. However, you must be vigilant for signs of equipment repair.

Ensuring that your crane works efficiently is the key to productivity and safety. By tackling these issues, you can avoid accidents and higher costs in the future.

Here are five signs of damages and when to call for an equipment repair immediately. Read on and learn more:

1. Corrosion on Equipment

Rust is notorious for damaging all kinds of equipment quickly. It’s one of the indicators that a crane needs new parts. 

Rusting always begins with the appearance of unusual small spots. A lot of employees overlook these spots as they look harmless. However, if left untreated, it can turn into an expensive problem to handle. 

For a crane, it deteriorates joints, screws, and bearings, affecting the load capacity. A corroded screw or bolt could play a factor for one of your staff members to get a serious injury.

2. Excessive Wearing

Cracks and wearing play a big role in a broken crane. It’s because of the stress due to the daily load they carry. An example of worn material is the bumper.

A worn bumper becomes more difficult to control and doesn’t stop even if you hit the brakes. It can later lead to safety risks and impact your crane or hoist’s performance. 

3. Leaking and Blistering Cords

A lot of cranes have a variety of hydraulic or pressurized hoses. They serve as support to reduce unneeded movement.

Inspect your hose for indications of leaks. Check the outer hose covering for blistering or deformation. These blisters indicate that something is clogging the hose, causing unusual sounds.

Failure to remedy this problem immediately can lead to water contamination. For any sight of leaks or blisters, call crane repair services immediately.

4. Warped Hooks

The hook bears the enormous stress of load during its daily operation. It makes them prone to bending, later leading to problems in carrying the future load. During crane inspection, if the hook warps out of its original shape, it’s best to replace it.

5. Crushed Link Cables

Crushed link cables are common crane equipment repair signs. If left unchecked, it causes the cable to snap, resulting in unwanted consequences. Fortunately, you can fix it immediately before continuing work.

Know These Crane Equipment Repair Signs Today

Don’t wait for a serious accident to happen in your work facility. Invest in crane equipment repair and ensure safety.

Are you having another kind of equipment repair problem? Contact us today, and we’ll see how we can help.

Uses of Mini Cranes

Cranes have been in the construction world for a long time. People in ancient Greece used them to build their temples, and the cranes were powered by donkeys or men.  

In the modern construction industry, there are many different types of cranes, and using the right crane for the job is important. 

Keep reading to learn about different types of cranes and how to choose the best one for you. 

Types of Cranes

There are a variety of different cranes, but most of them can be classified as either static cranes or mobile cranes. 

The specific type of crane that is best for you depends on aspects like where the worksite is and how heavy your loads will be.

Static Cranes

Static cranes are fixed to a point on the ground or on a building. They lift and move objects along a fixed pathway. 

People choose to use static cranes when they have low-capacity projects, have limited space, or need to be close to the side of the building. 

Tower cranes are a type of static crane. They are able to lift extremely heavy loads because of their stability. 

Another type of static crane, the hammerhead crane, is a very common crane that uses a swiveling lever attached to a fixed tower to move loads. 

Telescopic cranes are also static cranes. They have an arm, also known as a boom. A hydraulics system powers the boom. The hydraulics system allows the arm to extend and retract.

Telescopic cranes are often used in shipping ports to move heavy loads.  

Mobile Cranes

Unlike static cranes, mobile cranes are able to move around the worksite. There are different types of mobile cranes like mobile wheeled cranes, track-mounted cranes, and truck-mounted cranes. 

Mobile wheeled cranes sit on a wheeled chassis. There are stabilizers attached to the mobile wheeled crane to prevent movement when lifting loads.

Track-mounted cranes sit on a crawler unit that is diesel-powered. Because they are fixed to a track, they can move short distances around the worksite.

The use of a track-mounted crane is popular in worksites ground that is in bad shape.

Truck-mounted cranes attach to a truck that the driver controls from inside the cab. These cranes are easy to transport and are commonly used in short-term projects.

Loader cranes are often attached to trucks and work quickly to load and unload equipment. 

Mobile cranes are typically on sites with medium to heavy loads or in areas where the worksite requires flexibility and mobility.

Choosing the Right Crane for You

Choosing a crane does not have to be confusing. We at Kor-Pak, are leaders in the crane industry and offer different products and services to fit your needs.

Please contact us for more information about types of cranes and crane parts.

Your Ultimate Guide to Types of Cranes

Cranes have been in the construction world for a long time. People in ancient Greece used them to build their temples, and the cranes were powered by donkeys or men.  

In the modern construction industry, there are many different types of cranes, and using the right crane for the job is important. 

Keep reading to learn about different types of cranes and how to choose the best one for you. 

Types of Cranes

There are a variety of different cranes, but most of them can be classified as either static cranes or mobile cranes. 

The specific type of crane that is best for you depends on aspects like where the worksite is and how heavy your loads will be.

Static Cranes

Static cranes are fixed to a point on the ground or on a building. They lift and move objects along a fixed pathway. 

People choose to use static cranes when they have low-capacity projects, have limited space, or need to be close to the side of the building. 

Tower cranes are a type of static crane. They are able to lift extremely heavy loads because of their stability. 

Another type of static crane, the hammerhead crane, is a very common crane that uses a swiveling lever attached to a fixed tower to move loads. 

Telescopic cranes are also static cranes. They have an arm, also known as a boom. A hydraulics system powers the boom. The hydraulics system allows the arm to extend and retract.

Telescopic cranes are often used in shipping ports to move heavy loads.  

Mobile Cranes

Unlike static cranes, mobile cranes are able to move around the worksite. There are different types of mobile cranes like mobile wheeled cranes, track-mounted cranes, and truck-mounted cranes. 

Mobile wheeled cranes sit on a wheeled chassis. There are stabilizers attached to the mobile wheeled crane to prevent movement when lifting loads.

Track-mounted cranes sit on a crawler unit that is diesel-powered. Because they are fixed to a track, they can move short distances around the worksite.

The use of a track-mounted crane is popular in worksites ground that is in bad shape.

Truck-mounted cranes attach to a truck that the driver controls from inside the cab. These cranes are easy to transport and are commonly used in short-term projects.

Loader cranes are often attached to trucks and work quickly to load and unload equipment. 

Mobile cranes are typically on sites with medium to heavy loads or in areas where the worksite requires flexibility and mobility.

Choosing the Right Crane for You

Choosing a crane does not have to be confusing. We at Kor-Pak, are leaders in the crane industry and offer different products and services to fit your needs.

Please contact us for more information about types of cranes and crane parts.

3 Ways to Modernize With Your Next Overhead Crane Service

Consider the benefits of crane modernization before committing to upgrading to a new crane. Your next overhead crane service could save you a lot of time and money if you consider the various upgrade options.

Many companies think they need to take the financial hit on a new overhead crane. This happens as a result of an inadequate inspection or discovering obsolete parts. With the right crane upgrades, they can achieve compliance, increased performance, and financial savings.

In this article, we discuss the three ways to modernize with your next overhead crane service. Continue reading to find out how to make the most of your existing crane.

Why Modernize Your Overhead Crane?

Benefits of overhead crane upgrades include extending the life of your crane and increasing reliability.

Both of these benefits also help you save money. This is because upgrading is often more cost-effective than completely replacing an otherwise functional crane.

You also may look to modernize if inspections show non-compliance or significant wear. Plus, you can increase worker’s safety. Upgrading can ensure compliance without breaking the bank.

Overhead Crane Modernization Options

Poor crane performance doesn’t mean you have to upgrade to a new crane. The same can be said if certain parts are nearing the end of their lifespan. There are several crane upgrades to consider before deciding on upgrading. 

The most common and beneficial crane maintenance options include increasing capacity, renewing electrical components, and crane relocation.

Be sure to discuss these options before your next overhead crane service. Plus, consider all of our other modernization and upgrade options.

Increase Capacity

If your company’s production or manufacturing processes have changed, you may need to upgrade your crane’s capacity. This is also true if it’s not meeting modern safety or efficiency standards.

Increasing capacity as part of overhead crane modernization involves an initial feasibility study. This process helps determine if the increased capacity is possible. To do this, they consider the crane’s structure as well as its mechanical and electrical parts. 

If the feasibility study confirms the possibility of increasing crane capacity, then you will need a structural engineering analysis. This analysis is more costly but also more in-depth than the feasibility study.

Renew Electrical Components

Consider renewing electrical components if you want to minimize downtime and increase efficiency. There are several overhead crane parts to achieve this. 

For example, upgrading speed and motion controls is a good place to start your next overhead crane service. These parts increase performance and result in less repair time. Plus, it’s one of the less costly modernization options available. 

Crane Relocation

When processes change, crane relocation may be necessary. Relocating a crane is more cost-effective than purchasing something entirely new. This is true even if you are planning to move to a completely new facility.

This process is more complex than standard crane maintenance. That’s why working with the right company is essential. 

Be Prepared Before Your Next Overhead Crane Service

Your next overhead crane service provides the opportunity for the modernization you need. If you’re considering upgrading to a new overhead crane, you may be worried about costs. Take a moment to consider how crane upgrades can achieve your goals and save you money. 

Contact us today to receive a quote on upgrading your overhead crane. 

Crane Inspection Requirements: A Brief Guide

Every industrial business owner is all too familiar with the word “inspections.” There are safety inspections, OSHA inspections, annual inspections, and many other types of inspections. Teams need to prepare for all of these. 

And, for any business that operates cranes as part of their industrial machinery, undergoing a routine crane inspection is one of those. That way, regulatory agencies can ensure the cranes are being operated safely. 

If you’re unsure of what to expect when the crane inspector comes knocking, don’t worry. Let’s take a quick look at what requirements your crane needs to meet to pass inspections. 

Types of Crane Inspections

To best understand how crane inspections work, you need to understand the different types of crane inspections. Under OSHA, these fall into a few main categories. 

The Initial Crane Inspection

The initial crane inspection is a test that businesses must conduct after installing a new crane. It also applies to any crane that has been reinstalled after undergoing renovations or repairs.   

During this type of inspection, the crane must pass a visual test once it has been properly installed. Businesses must provide documentation showing that the crane passed the initial inspection. They won’t be able to use the crane until they can provide documentation.

Functional Test Inspection

The next type of crane inspection is something called a functional test inspection. These are inspections that are conducted every time someone uses the machinery.

Before using the machinery, OSHA requires a visual test of the crane’s functionality to carry out operations safely. The inspections check for functionality, damage, and aging on the machine before use.

Frequent Crane Inspections

A frequent crane inspection includes all the components of a functional test inspection. However, it doesn’t require documentation. It’s also carried out more regularly and must test the machinery’s operations. Frequent crane inspections require a visual inspection to ensure there is no need for repairs.

These inspections are carried out daily, weekly, or monthly depending on the classification of the crane. The more the crane is used, the more frequent its inspections will need to be. 

Periodic Crane Inspections

This type of inspection is the least frequent of all the crane inspections that are typically conducted. Its frequency is based on how much the machinery is used and is generally conducted annually or quarterly. 

Periodic crane inspections are typically a thorough visual and functional test of all the crane’s components. Depending on the outcome of the periodic inspection, you may be required to undergo additional tests or do maintenance on your machinery.

Bring It All Together: Why Crane Inspections Matter

Crane inspections aren’t carried out just to make OSHA happy. They’re essential because they’re what keep your operations running smoothly and your employees safe on the job. 

If your business frequently uses cranes and you want to keep your employees safe and adhere to OSHA guidelines, you need to make sure you’re keeping up with inspections.

The team at Kor-Pak can help you conduct all the crane inspections you need. Give us a call, and we’ll help you schedule your next frequent or periodic crane inspection. 

Crane Maintenance: Signs It’s Time to Replace Crane Wheels

Cranes play a big role in many large construction sites; there’s simply no way many jobs could get done without these tools. But they can be major safety hazards if not taken care of properly to both those operating the machine and everyone else on the site. 

One of the areas of the machines that often get overlooked is the crane wheels. They should regularly be inspected and upgraded to ensure the machine can work properly and everyone involved isn’t at risk. Sometimes it isn’t easy to know when the best time for replacement is. 

Luckily, we’ve created a guide to help you know when it’s the time!

Obvious Signs of Wear

A visual inspection of each part of the machine should be a part of your preventive crane maintenance routine. Often, there will be undeniable signs of crane damage that can be caught early and replaced with no problems. 

As you look at your crane wheels, pay particular attention to the treads and how they’re wearing down. Uneven wear can be a sign of another problem. But you can also tell how effective the wheels will be and if it’s necessary to change them or keep an eye on them for the next little while. 

Increased Load for Jobs 

Not every construction job is the same, and so the same equipment or parts on that equipment will work no matter what. Some jobs will have a higher load, which means you’ll need different wheels to accommodate that extra weight

Each wheel will come with specifications for what they’re capable of, which will show you whether you need to replace it or not. 

Taking a closer look at the wheels is a great way of crane troubleshooting to avoid running into problems that will slow the whole project down. 

Routine Maintenance 

It’s tempting to skimp on your crane maintenance schedule and try to stretch out the life of your parts and machinery as long as possible. But that can lead to even more expensive upgrades down the road. 

Routine, regular maintenance will extend the life of your crane by eliminating damage caused by broken or worn-out parts. 

If you can replace worn-out parts before they break, they won’t have the opportunity to cause damage to other areas or give out entirely. The extra effort and money upfront will pay off every day you don’t run into a huge problem. 

When to Replace Crane Wheels

There’s so much to manage on a construction site, and all of the tiny details make a huge impact on the job’s success. Even the crane wheels and their replacement can slow everything down or, worse, cause an accident that stops production altogether. 

It’s important to pay close attention to your crane parts to keep things running as smoothly as possible. An inspection doesn’t have to be a major undertaking, but it should be someone’s responsibility to make sure it gets done when it should and that anything that’s found can be taken care of quickly. 

If you need parts for your construction equipment or you’re interested in overhauling your cranes, contact us today! 

The Demag AC 500-8 All-Terrain Crane Doing Big Things

When your construction project merits an all-terrain crane, look no further than the Demag AC 500-8. Demag cranes have a reputation for reliability and performance.

No matter what type of infrastructure projects you have in mind, the Demag AC 500-8 has got you covered. From traversing uneven ground to facilitating bridge-building, the AC 500-8 can handle the job.

Read on to find out how the AC 500-8 all-terrain crane can be of service to you. That way, you will be sure to have the very best equipment for your project.

The Construction Industry Is Booming

The construction industry is booming, especially with the introduction of the current infrastructure plan. The demand for heavy equipment such as cranes is only projected to grow in the coming years.

A Compact All-Terrain Crane

Big things come in small packages sometimes, and the Demag AC 500-8 is a prime example of this saying. Despite its compact size, this crane packs a punch with a capacity class of 600 U.S. tons.

With eight axles and off-road capabilities, the AC 500-8 is sure to be able to get to your job site, no matter how remote or inaccessible. With a larger than average system length, the AC 500-8 is renowned for its reach.

Why go with a larger crane when this is fully capable of almost anything you have to throw at it? If you could only have one crane, this is your best overall package.

Reputation for Excellence 

The Demag name has a long reputation for excellent performance in the field. The company has deep roots of over 100 years old. You can check out the complete history of Demag here.

Since its conception, Demag has striven to provide excellent equipment of every sort as they have grown and developed as a company.

They are now one of the top recognized brands in the industry for cranes and other heavy equipment.

Where to Get Demag Cranes

Your best bet to obtain a Demag crane is from a certified heavy equipment dealer specializing in mobile cranes and hoists. A good dealer will be able to evaluate your project’s specific circumstances on a case-by-case basis.

They will tell you what best fits your building job or project and recommend you the proper equipment. A good crane distributor will be knowledgeable and have access to multiple different kinds of equipment.

That way, you will be sure to get what you need no matter how tough or extensive your construction project may be.

Get the Best Equipment for Your Project

Your company’s quality of work and reputation all hinges on the quality of your equipment. If you seek top-tier quality for an all-terrain crane, your best bet is the Demag AC 500-8.

Have the confidence to take on even the most challenging of infrastructure projects. Contact us today to go over your options for purchasing a Demag AC 500-8.

The Hidden Costs of Downtime in Crane Servicing

Having both a speedy and effective crane servicing team helps prevent accidents and reduces the costs of downtime.

Content

In the construction industry, periods of downtime are inevitable. They may be the result of bad weather, personnel issues, or breaks for maintenance. 

Cranes are a type of construction machinery that builders rely on. Large-scale projects would be impossible without them. Crews have to inspect them regularly to ensure that they are safe and operating efficiently.

Downtime can be expensive, so companies try to keep it to a minimum while still ensuring safety.

It’s essential to understand what’s behind crane servicing costs. It explains why maintenance downtime can be so expensive. Here’s a brief overview, including what you can do to reduce downtime.

What Is the Cost of Downtime for Crane Servicing?

Construction companies tend to lose money when their equipment undergoes repairs or maintenance. If they own a crane, they will likely pay more in labor costs.

In contrast, renting usually means extra daily fees and sometimes storage charges. Here’s a look at the characteristics of planned and unplanned crane downtime.

Planned Downtime

Many companies follow specific maintenance timelines. This helps them predict precisely when a crane will be out of service. Another way of describing planned downtime is to call it preventive maintenance.

Preventive maintenance involves checking each system, whether it’s electrical, computer, or mechanical. During a maintenance check, technicians follow specific quality standards. They look for signs of strain and replace any parts that look worn or broken.

Sometimes this can include upgrading a crane’s parts or replacing old systems. A total overhaul can go a long way towards preventing breakdowns.

The goal of planned downtime is to prevent unplanned downtime.

Unplanned Downtime

Unplanned crane downtime is most often the result of something breaking or malfunctioning. Unplanned downtime can be as high as 20-30% in the construction industry.

Construction managers prefer to avoid it but always allow for it in their time estimates. Unfortunately, operational costs can skyrocket in this scenario. For every minute of downtime, money evaporates.

Waiting around for crane repairs means that the entire building project has to stop. This results in all kinds of hidden costs. 

Hidden costs include shipping fees for parts, labor, extra rental fees, and storage charges. Another problem is unhappy clients. They rarely understand when a project gets behind schedule.

How to Reduce Your Downtime Costs

It is possible to control crane servicing costs with the right type of preparation. If a crane operator has a specialist maintenance company on standby, they can cut the downtime for repairs. 

We can create custom parts in-house, and we’re experts in servicing many of the crane brands in use today.

Our experience comes from working in a variety of industries. These include oil and gas, wind power, maritime, agriculture, steel and iron, mining, etc.

To request a quote or find out more about what we can do for you, contact us today!

Your Guide to the Loader Crane

Does your company regularly resupply crane parts? Are you a dock worker that needs reliable crane operations? Do you know any engineers that need some heavy-lifting machinery?

Then loader cranes are probably the right fit for you. Also known as a knuckle-boom crane, loader cranes are instrumental in most industrial work. 

But how do you choose the right loader crane? And how do you maintain them properly?

That’s what we’re here to discuss today. Read on to learn about the different types of loader cranes and how they can be maintained. 

Types of Cranes

You might be wondering where loader cranes fit into other types. Let’s discuss some common cranes here:

Static Cranes

These types are what their name suggests. They stay in place, and mobility is minimal. This includes tower cranes that are designed to carry huge loads. 

Self-erecting cranes can hoist loads vertically and place them horizontally. Their small footprint makes them ideal for city projects. 

Mobile Cranes

These are cranes attached to vehicles such as trucks. These cranes often have 180- or 360-degree rotation. They’re often built smaller and for different terrains. 

Where Do Loader Cranes Fit?

Loader cranes, also known as articulating cranes and knuckle-boom cranes, are often attached to vehicles. This makes them incredibly mobile. 

Loader Crane Maintenance Tips

If you have a loader crane, you need to take care of it for long-term use. Here are some key tips for maintaining your loader crane:

Routine Checks 

Routine checks prevent worries about your loader crane malfunctioning during a critical project. Checking each component for wear-and-tear is crucial here. 

This also involves lubricating, moving parts, and changing oils constantly. Hiring professional maintenance crews might be worthwhile here. 

Mandatory Inspections

This is a critical strategy to keep all of your workers accountable for their equipment. If you lead a large team, it’s impossible to check on every detail yourself. 

If you issue mandatory inspections, workers will be forced to take care of your loader cranes. This boosts safety. 

Hiring inspectors during these audits would also be a great idea. Cross-referencing with industry standards will help keep your workers and project sites safe. 

Preventive Care

This form of care requires making sure all parts of your loader crane are operating at mandatory standards. If they’re below factory standard levels, it’s time to take some preventative measures. 

This keeps your crane from breaking down at inopportune times. While you might not think that your crane needs immediate care, preventative measures go a long way. 

Also, consider buying spare parts as part of preventive care. You never want to be stuck with a broken crane that doesn’t have the right parts for replacement. 

Get the Right Loader Crane Today

While different types of cranes fit various roles, loader cranes can benefit your site right away. Use this guide to help you decide whether or not your company needs a loader crane. 

Are you looking for reliable crane materials? Want to improve your loader crane handling? Contact us today, and we’ll get you started on a solution right away!

Future Perspective: AI and Data Analysis in Crane Control

Working with cranes is a high-stakes project. From damaging cargo to putting human lives at stake, there’s a lot that can go wrong. 

That’s why modernization and crane automation are so important. Technology is progressing at warp speed, and keeping up can make all the difference in safety and productivity.

Whether you’re a crane controller or an engineer, we’ve got an inside look at how AI and data analysis will revolutionize boom crane automation in the digital age.

Artificial Intelligence for Crane Controls

For a crane controller, each decision is fraught with importance. Making minute adjustments changes the size of the load, the speed of the swing can cause disaster, and safely depositing the load is a challenge.

This takes a lot of skill, precision, and hand-eye coordination. Even with the most skilled crane controller, human error can still impact safety in the workplace.

That’s why artificial intelligence can skyrocket productivity for construction projects. AI uses camera input, computer vision software, and visual data input to perform each movement.

The AI system can then communicate with crane controllers to inform them of any people, obstacles, or hazards nearby. This alters the crane’s movements. Much like a collision alert system in a car, it alerts human operators of the potential danger they might not be able to see or avert in time.

With artificial intelligence acting on real-time data, crane controls can be automated to improve construction efficiency drastically. This can boost precision in the crane’s movements by up to 30%.

Construction projects are notorious for running over schedule and budget. With increased speed, safety, and precision, smart crane solutions help solve this issue.

Data Analysis for Crane Controls

Is your crane on the verge of breaking down? If time is of the essence, data analysis paired with AI can perform diagnostics. This can help you pinpoint where repairs are necessary and alert you when maintenance you need to handle maintenance.

This can prevent costly downtime where your crane is out of order. It can also prevent disaster, where your crane breaks, collapses, or drops a load due to parts failing.

Data analysis can also inform you about inventory. How many logs, containers, or pieces of machinery is your crane picking up and moving? How many logs have moved to Yard A, and how many did it move to Yard B?

Data analysis can keep you on track regarding crane repairs, maintenance, and inventory tracking.

Equipment Maintenance for a Crane Controller

The construction industry is sometimes behind the curve when it comes to digital solutions. Whether you’re an engineer or a crane controller, it’s essential to keep up to date on the latest options.

However, nothing will completely replace human expertise. Whether you’re looking for heavy industry parts or services, we’ve got you covered. Contact us today to see what we can do for you!