Protecting Your Workers and Facility: Overhead Crane Safety

There is an average of 71 fatal accidents involving cranes in the United States every year.

It’s essential to understand overhead crane safety to avoid injury or death to your workers. By following these simple tips, you can help prevent numerous workplace accidents.

Keep reading to learn more about overhead crane operation and how to ensure the safety of everyone in your company.

1. Set up Daily Inspections

You should be doing a full, in-depth inspection of your crane every single day. Everything that’s checked should be noted in a log book where anything unusual is written.

Some things to check every day include:

  • Operating mechanisms
  • Lines, tanks, and valves
  • Hooks
  • Hoist chains and ropes
  • Slings

Any unusual findings should immediately be addressed, and the crane should never be operated if there are any suspicions that it may not be working correctly.

2. Inspect Before Every Lift

You should also be doing a quick visual inspection before every lift. This ensures nothing unusual has happened since the previous lift. It also allows you to make sure the loading area is clear of anything that could interfere with the next lift.

3. Always Confirm Suitability

If you always lift the same amount of weight with your crane, you can skip this step. However, if you are frequently moving objects of different weights, you need to ensure that your crane is capable of lifting them safely.

Carefully check everything from the type of motor you have to the sling and hook before lifting something. If you attempt to lift something heavier than what your crane can handle, the lift could end in disaster.

4. Use Clear Communication

In most cases, you won’t be able to speak directly to the crane operator. That’s why it’s crucial to have a qualified crane operator signal person on the ground.

This person should know the proper hand signals needed to safely direct the crane operator, so the job is completed without putting anyone in danger.

You’ll also want to communicate with everyone on the ground when a load is going up. This allows workers to clear the area while the crane is in operation.

5. Limit Crane Access

Speaking of qualified personnel, access to the crane must be limited to only those who know how to operate it. In the wrong hands, an overhead crane can be deadly. Use locks and keycards to restrict crane access.

6. Minimize Load Swing

Make sure your crane operators are both qualified and skilled at operating a crane. This means they can smoothly move the load to minimize the amount of moving it does.

When the load swings, it puts unnecessary pressure on components and can create an unsafe work environment.

7. Keep Equipment Clean

This should go without saying, but avoid storing slings and other crane equipment on the floor. By keeping everything clean, you can keep it in good working order which will decrease the chances of failure.

Learn More About Overhead Crane Safety

Now you have a list of ways you can ensure the safety of yourself and your employees when using cranes.

Learn more about overhead crane safety; check out our article on small mobile crane maintenance. There, you’ll find additional information on how you can keep your crane running the way it should.

4 Things Custom Machined Parts Can Do That Factory Made Parts Can’t

Custom machining parts might seem like a luxury that doesn’t have a lot of pay off. This couldn’t be further from the truth.

Having custom parts will allow you to do jobs that either you couldn’t do or do well with factory made parts.

Other times your machines might need custom parts to keep them up and running correctly. We’ve made a list of things that custom parts can help with. Let’s learn more!

1. Handle Special Jobs

Some jobs will require special tools or parts to complete. In the past, you may have had to turn down some of these because you didn’t have the right equipment. Not anymore.

If you can custom make parts, then you can adapt the equipment that you do have. With the made-to-order parts, every task will seem to be much easier. This improves workforce productivity and allows you to grow your bottom line along the way.

2. Replace Old or Discontinued Parts

After you have machines for some time, they can become outdated or obsolete. That makes it hard to replace the parts as they wair out.  If an older machine that you use regularly goes out, you’ll lose money either in the downtime or by having to buy a new machine.

This is where custom made parts come in. You can easily have the part made to fit your machine regardless of how old it is. People who make these part can reverse engineer just about anything. You’ll just bring in the old part, and a new one can be made. This can cut down your wait time and get you back up and running quicker.

3. Give You a Hand with Tricky Material

Some materials are harder to work with than others, especially if you don’t have the right parts. Examples include plastics, bronze, and steel equipment.

You can’t use your regular equipment and processes with them. Because of this you might have had to limit the materials that you’ve worked with in the past.

4. Streamline Production

When you have custom equipment, you can cut down on time it takes you to do a job. Since the equipment that you are using is specially made for the job you are doing, you can get to it faster and better.

If you can make your own custom parts, then you never have to deal with suppliers. That also means you can make adjustments as you go without having to wait for someone else to send you more parts.

Regular Factory Made Parts Don’t Do All of That

When all of your employees are working at their full capacity, you’ll save a lot of money. For most companies, paying employees accounts for about 90% of total operating costs. When they work more, you make more.

Factory-made parts are limited in what they can do, while custom-made parts offer more versatility.

If you want to be able to take advantage of the things that custom factory parts can do for you, contact us.

 

Protecting Your Workers and Facility: Overhead Crane Safety

There is an average of 71 fatal accidents involving cranes in the United States every year.

It’s essential to understand overhead crane safety to avoid injury or death to your workers. By following these simple tips, you can help prevent numerous workplace accidents.

Keep reading to learn more about overhead crane operation and how to ensure the safety of everyone in your company.

1. Set up Daily Inspections

You should be doing a full, in-depth inspection of your crane every single day. Everything that’s checked should be noted in a log book where anything unusual can be written.

Some things to check every day include:

  • Operating mechanisms
  • Lines, tanks, and valves
  • Hooks
  • Hoist chains and ropes
  • Slings

Any unusual findings should immediately be addressed and the crane should never be operated if there are any suspicions that it may not be working correctly.

2. Inspect Before Every Lift

You should also be doing a quick visual inspection before every lift. This ensures nothing unusual has happened since the previous lift. It also allows you to make sure the loading area is clear of anything that could interfere with the next lift.

3. Always Confirm Suitability

If you always lift the same amount of weight with your crane, you can skip this step. However, if you are frequently moving objects of different weights, you need to ensure that your crane is capable of lifting them safely.

Carefully check everything from the type of motor you have to the sling and hook before lifting something. If you attempt to lift something heavier than what your crane can handle, the lift could end in disaster.

4. Use Clear Communication

In most cases, you won’t be able to speak directly to the crane operator. That’s why it’s crucial to have a qualified crane operator signal person on the ground.

This person should know the proper hand signals needed to safely direct the crane operator, so the job is completed without putting anyone in danger.

You’ll also want to communicate with everyone on the ground when a load is going up. This allows workers to clear the area while the crane is in operation.

5. Limit Crane Access

Crane access must be limited to only those who know how to operate it. In the wrong hands, an overhead crane can be deadly. Use locks and keycards to restrict crane access.

6. Minimize Load Swing

Make sure your crane operators are both qualified and skilled at operating a crane. This means they can smoothly move the load to minimize the amount of moving it does.

When the load swings, it puts unnecessary pressure on components and can create an unsafe work environment.

7. Keep Equipment Clean

This should go without saying, but avoid storing slings and other crane equipment on the floor. By keeping everything clean, you can keep it in good working order which will decrease the chances of failure.

Learn More About Overhead Crane Safety

Now you have a list of ways you can ensure the safety of yourself and your employees when using cranes.

Check out our article on small mobile crane maintenance. There, you’ll find additional information on how you can keep your crane running the way it should.

What You Need to Know to Keep Your Wind Turbine Running Smoothly

Want to lower your electricity bill by 100%?

You can use the green energy of your very own wind turbine to reduce energy costs in your own home. But it depends on a few factors.

Are you comfortable working with AC and DC wiring? Can you safely connect a battery? Are you comfortable pouring cement and renting heavy equipment such as a lift? Then you may be up for the project of installing your own micro wind turbine!

As someone who is already confident maintaining and fixing your own equipment, you might want to consider adding a wind turbine to your skill set. Below we’ve created a guide to wind turbines, to help you take advantage of the power of the wind!

How Wind Turbines Work

Giant wind turbines catch energy from either moving liquid or gas, as they spin around. They rotate because of the shape of their blades, which have a slight curve to them. This is similar to how wind lifts an airplane due to the shape of its wings. Except, in this case, the wind pushes the turbines or giant rotor blades.

The length of the rotor blade determines how much energy the turbine produces. They are usually about 230 feet long. It will also depend on the speed of the wind, which causes the turbines to spin faster.

If the wind blows twice as quickly, your turbines will produce eight times more energy. This is because wind energy is your turbine’s speed cubed.

Wind Power: Pros & Cons

The generator is the part of the wind turbine that takes the kinetic energy created by the wind turning the turbines and converts it into electrical energy. This can then be used to light a home or other building.

One nice aspect of wind turbine energy is that it doesn’t produce greenhouse gas emissions or pollution. However, there are some disadvantages to wind turbines, the most obvious being that they don’t generate as much energy as coal, gas or a nuclear plant. You would need about 1000 2MW wind turbines to keep up with a coal plant.

Plus wind power is dependent on, well, wind. Which as you know isn’t consistent. Lastly, it takes up a lot of space because each wind turbine must be a significant distance apart.

This is because as the wind passes through the turbines, it slows down.

Harness the Power of the Wind

If you’d like to take advantage of wind energy in your own home, you can install your own micro wind turbine. Small windmill generators can be a great way to save on electricity bills and also help the environment. But location is everything when it comes to turbines.

You will need to live in an area with very few obstructions from things like buildings or trees. These can block wind and prevent your turbines from generating energy. You will also need to speak with your town to make sure tall towers are allowed in your neighborhood.

The tower must be installed 30 feet above any obstruction in the area. Once you’ve determined that your location will work, consider finding ways to make your home more energy efficient. This will not only instantly reduce the cost of your energy bills but will also allow you to purchase a smaller renewable energy system.

There are plenty of energy saving tips to help you get started. When choosing a wind turbine, you will need to consult a professional manufacturer who will provide a total cost for all the parts you need as well as the labor. If you are unable to connect your wind turbine to a grid, you need a standalone battery.

Deep-cycle batteries are best for wind turbines since they can discharge and recharge 80% of their energy 100 times! Automotive batteries aren’t recommended.

You can learn more about setting up your own micro wind turbine through resources such as the Clean Energy States Alliance.

Wind Turbine Maintenance

Building your own small wind turbine might be the start of some major savings for you and your family!

If you’re ready to get started and are searching for specific parts, we’ve got an inventory you can’t miss!

5 Different Types of Testing to Perform on Your Equipment

Do you work in construction and use heavy equipment regularly? Can the environment make it hard for the machinery to operate correctly?

We happen to know a few ways to ensure that your equipment performs well.

A variety of tests are available to test the durability of the material you use on the job. They ensure that your tools function no matter what the weather is like.

With these techniques, you can save money on new machines and learn how to use your equipment in different scenarios. By using our services, you can have an easy time operating cranes, bulldozers, loaders, excavators, and other machines.

Here are five different types of testing to perform on your equipment to ensure their functionality.

1. Shock Testing

The quality of construction equipment depends on how well they can handle being moved around. There’s a way to make sure that it doesn’t fall over in these scenarios.

The material testing equipment for this option includes free-fall shock towers that simulate shock waves. Common sources of shock waves that construction equipment deals with include shipping, loading, and transport.

No matter how careful you try to be with your machines in loading docks, the wrong move can cause it to fall over. Even if you have to drop the equipment during placement, the force can cause it to tip to the side.

The shock towers can drop your machines from different heights and angles to see how much force they can take. It’s best to drop it from all angles to see if there are any weak spots.

We recommend this testing for those working with larger amounts of equipment. This can come in handy for projects in populated areas, or those that involve large structures.

2. Temperature and Humidity (Different Types of Testing)

The extreme heat and cold of the summer and winter can make it harder to operate cranes, bulldozers, and other large equipment. While the majority of these machines are designed for these conditions, you can never be too safe.

If you want your equipment to perform consistently, you should try it at different temperatures and humidities in environmental test chambers. The best options are below 0 degrees Fahrenheit and over 100 degrees Fahrenheit.

Not all equipment is made of the same material, so some machinery will be able to handle specific temperatures better than others. We suggest testing everything you use, from iron to steel.

These material testing methods may not be needed during the Fall or Spring, which don’t experience such extremes. However, you should be ready just in case the temperature is still relatively high in November, or it’s still cold enough in April to get snow.

These chambers also come in handy in case you have to move the equipment to another part of the world that’s warmer or colder than where you are now. This will prepare your machines for whatever the area you’re traveling to has to offer.

3. Chemical Resistance Testing

Your equipment may be tough enough to handle extreme cold and heat. However, it may not be able to withstand certain chemicals.

Anti-freeze, fertilizers, insecticides, and other chemicals may be more harmful to machinery than they are to what you are usually using them on. This can lead the tools to degrade and break apart over time.

The age of the equipment may affect how much of these chemicals it can take. If you’ve been using the same machines for years, then you’ll have a tougher time in this situation.

Make sure to spray these chemicals and their components on your tools. Some machinery may take longer to react than others, but you’ll need to keep an eye on them.

This test is significant if you’re going to be renting equipment for a certain project. Spraying chemicals on it before you use it will save you plenty of time and money on finding replacements.

4. Sand and Dust Testing

Some people in the construction industry have the luxury of working in more pleasant environments. Others, however, have to work in places where dust and sand are common.

This material can keep your machines from working by collecting into parts that affect movement. If they stick to your tools long enough and in certain conditions, they can reduce the toughness of the object’s surface.

That’s where lab testing machines come in. Enclosed chambers have been designed to blow sand, dust, and gravel at your machines to test their resistance.

You will need to consider factors such as pressure, temperature, concentration, and humidity during the tests. Parts you should test include seals, enclosures, coatings, and brakes to ensure the equipment can move and stop when you need to.

Make sure that the tests include large particles, which are very common in the outdoors. If you don’t live in areas where sand and dust are common, these tests can still help in case you eventually have to work in such an environment.

5. UV Exposure Testing

As good as the sun may feel after months of low temperatures, your equipment may not feel the same way. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation may be keeping your machines from performing as they should.

Different types of material can handle UV exposure better than others. Enough exposure can cause cracks and peels in the coating, as well as a loss of strength in the surface.

With Xenon-arc UV exposure, your construction equipment will be able to handle the worse that the sun can throw at it. This test consists of bulbs that create a spectrum of natural sunlight to shine on the material.

You should first consider how much sunlight the area where you’re working is exposed to throughout the year. Tests during cloudier or colder days can prepare your machines for brighter days.

If you’re working on a variety of projects, you may need to conduct more tests. Some buildings consist of more steel or bricks than others, and their location can affect how much UV exposure they experience.

Our Take

Construction equipment requires different types of testing to be ready for any situation. Weather and the environment come with a variety of challenges, and the material and tactics you use to move machines face damage risks.

However, with the right testing machines and settings, you can keep your equipment in shape and running for a long time.

Check out more of our tips today so that your construction equipment stays strong and continues to produce amazing projects.

Your Complete Guide to Scan Pac Replacement Parts

Are your brakes breaking? Need more friction in a clutch situation? Stopping power when you need it isn’t a luxury – it’s a necessity!  Safety is no accident, and you shouldn’t delay replacing worn friction components in any of your systems.

Quality friction material, adequately selected according to its attributes, is crucial to daily safe operations of your business. Scan-Pac Manufacturing produces a wide array of products to suit your needs. Read on to learn more.

Fact and Friction

The need for friction materials drives a global market that’s projected to increase at a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 5.2% between 2019 and 2023.

The worldwide value will reach nearly $24.7 billion by 2023, according to a recently published report. So, friction is not a slippery slope by any stretch!  

By way of definition, friction materials are used in systems that require direct contact pressure between two or more parts to control speed.

Obviously, due to direct contact during use, friction materials wear down and become less effective over time. However, the rate of wear varies. Different materials have predictable capacities for wear and performance under specified conditions (such as temperature range encountered, speed requirements et al.).

Click here for a description of various friction materials and how they are used in various applications.  

Since 1976, we have offered a full range of friction products serving numerous industries, including iron and steel, rail, wind power, mining, agriculture, and oil.

Scan-Pac Friction Replacement Parts

We are pleased with our long partnership with industry leader Scan-Pac Manufacturing, featuring non-asbestos friction materials in:

  • Cranes, Shovel & Draglines
  • Overhead Crane Linings
  • Gear Tooth Facings
  • Flat Sheet
  • Oilfield Frictions
  • Green Gripper Woven
  • Flexible Molded Linings
  • Gemini Frictions
  • Forklift Sets
  • Plant Frictions
  • Paper Mill Frictions
  • Off-Road Equipment

Scan-Pac has been ISO 9001-certified for over 16 years. Their commitment to producing the finest quality friction materials available on the market today, at competitive prices, is unwavering. It’s no wonder that Scan-Pac products are so popular with our customer base.

Among their many product offerings, Scan-Pac supplies:

  • Clutch and brake applications for agriculture, overhead cranes, and lift trucks
    • RF38 materials
    • Semi-metallic SM003 for high-energy brakes on cranes
  • Brake blocks, draw-works sets, molded cathead linings and gear tooth clutch facings for oil drilling, well service rigs
    • RF72 materials
  • Blocks, bearings, and “eel slip” wiper blades for the paper industry

    • RF11 and RF44 materials for paper mill winding machines that involve constant drag and tension
  • Vertical and horizontal center plate liners, equalizer seats, snubbers, and wear plates for the railroad industry
    • “Gatke” phenolic laminate materials for severe load and impact needs
  • “Yaw” brakes and torque limiters for windmills
    • RF72 materials
  • Flexible woven materials for winches used in construction, industrial, and marine applications
    • GGW, Gemini woven, 2420R materials
    • GGW especially good in harsh environments such as workboats and dock handling winches

Scan-Pac’s reputation for high quality at a reasonable cost is their hallmark!

We Are Your Friction Experts

Kor-Pak is a customer-focused, relationship-based company whom you can rely on for expert advice on solving all your friction material puzzles. Scan-Pac produces many materials that could offer solutions for your business.

You need a supplier that understands all aspects of friction material application – from the mundane to the complex. Contact us today and let us help!

What Are the Different Types of Cranes and Which One Is Right for You?

Cranes help us lift heavy objects with ease.

Without them, getting construction and manufacturing jobs done would be more difficult and time-consuming.

There are different cranes for different situations, and it’s important to know which one is right for you.

Continue reading to learn about the various types of cranes.

1. Mobile Crane

The mobile crane is a telescopic boom on a mobile platform. The fact that this crane has mobility makes it versatile. It’s a standard part of bridge, building, and highway constructions.

2. Floating Crane

This kind of crane is mainly used for offshore jobs and remains in a fixed position. They have a high lifting capacity of 9,000 tons, making it possible for them to get entire sunken ships out of the water. They are for bridge and port constructions.

3. Telescopic Crane

A telescopic crane incorporates hydraulics to change the height of the boom. These types of cranes are especially good at lifting objects to or from a high place. A telescopic handler crane has something like a forklift attached to the end.

4. Harbor Crane

A harbor crane is located in ports. It loads and unloads ship materials safely because of its power. They can have a lifting capacity of around 154 tons.

5. Crawler Crane

The advantages of the crawler crane are that they move on tracks and can lift up to 3,500 tons. They’re able to work on hard or soft dirt because of the tracks.

6. Rough Terrain Crane

Rough terrain cranes are like they sound. They are for off-road construction sites. They move on four large tires and have one engine that powers the crane and the undercarriage.

7. All Terrain Crane

All terrain cranes can have the same purpose as a rough terrain crane, while also being able to work on a smooth surface. They can have 8 to 18 tires. This larger amount benefits the balance of the vehicle that moves the crane.

8. Truck Mounted Crane

These types of cranes are great for a site that requires a crane for a limited number of things. The crane is mounted on a truck, so it can travel on highways rather than needing another truck to transport it. The lifting capacity is up to 50 tons.

9. Level Luffing Crane

A level luffing crane is fixed in a shipyard. It has a hinged jib that moves the crane hook inwards and outwards while keeping it level. These cranes unload ships and move cargo containers.

10. Railroad Crane

Railroad cranes are designed to travel on railroad tracks for maintenance and repairs. The boom can reach up to 100 feet and can lift 250 tons.

11. Aerial Crane

Aerial cranes are moved by what looks like a helicopter. The actual crane is a series of cables that attach to and carry material. A large advantage is that they can pick up or drop off a load at any place.

An aerial crane might be used to bring materials to a skyscraper or rescue a ship crew in the middle of the ocean.

12. Tower Crane

These cranes are used for constructing tall buildings and can reach from 230 feet to 265 feet. They are attached to the ground by concrete and bolts.

Connecting them to the building in construction will stop the crane from moving and possibly falling over. Their lifting capacity is up to 20 tons.

13. Loader Crane

A loader crane is an addition to a truck or trailer that is used to load materials in the vehicle or unload them. The crane can be compacted when it isn’t needed. The highest lifting capacity is 200 tons.

Choosing from the Types of Cranes

To pick the type of crane that is right for you, consider the kind of job it is and where the site is. Never forget crane safety when operating a crane. If you have any questions, contact us by filling out a form or call (888) 256-7725.

Your Ultimate Guide to Understanding Limit Switches

Limit switches have provided safety and security for industrial applications for approximately 100 years. The technology has evolved, but it remains mostly the same. Many of the old Cutler-Hammer and Square D designs are still in operation.

In the following article, we’ll be discussing this simple yet life-saving (and cost-saving) device in all its glory. Let’s start the motor.

What Is a Limit Switch?

Let’s start with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. According to OSHA, a limit switch is defined as a device designed to “cut off the power to the motor and apply the brake to stop the carrier if a loaded step passes the terminal landing.”

The most common use of a limit switch is to limit travel of heavy loads attached to a crane. Over the years, other applications have benefitted from the device, such as conveyors, hoists, and heavy moving machinery.

The goal is to prevent over-travel and maintain control throughout the motion of the load. The first limit switches entered the industrial market in the 1920s. Today, they serve industries like:

  • Steel
  • Auto
  • Intermodal/rail
  • Manufacturing
  • Mining

You’ll find them in shipyards, ports, factories, and industrial plants. They’re also available on consumer products, with the most obvious that comes to mind being the electronic garage door opener at your house, if you have one.

The Basic Functions of a Limit Switch

A limit switch only does four basic things, but they’re important ones. It senses the location of an object, the motion, the positioning, and the end-travel.

Many “crane fails” occur due to a breakdown in these functions. For example, a crane is hoisting a megaton-load at a top rate of speed. Given the heaviness of that load, the crane will need ample warning before the load reaches the top, so it knows to slow the speed.

A breakdown in the contact that controls speed would send the load full-throttle to the top of the crane. The abrupt stop would cause a violent shift and a probable break.

But let’s say the speed contact is fine. It’s the stop limit that’s deficient. In this case, the travel of the load might slow, but the operation would continue working to hoist the load, thus bringing about unsafe positioning/swaying.

Most limit switches also contain an “ultimate” stop limit that acts as an override to the stop limit. If it and the stop limit are damaged, the same result will occur.

Parts of a Limit Switch

Most limit switches are composed of actuators, connectors, seals, enclosure cases, and a built-in basic switch. Here’s a bit about each one:

Actuator

External force and movements need to be communicated to the basic built-in switch. This is the component that makes that connection.

Built-in Basic Switch

This component switches an electrical circuit. The electrical circuit allows the limit switch to operate without the need for manual involvement.

Connectors

These protect the internal mechanics of the limit switch, securing the cables and outside connection.

Enclosure Casing

This mainly protects the built-in basic switch from external pressure. It, too, is vital for the overall operation.

Seals

These primarily protect the built-in basic switch and internal components. Since cranes and conveyors often operate in harsh environmental conditions, these are essential for the integrity of the limit switch as a whole.

The interconnectivity of all these components is essential. Therefore, limit switches must be inspected and maintained regularly.

Limit Switches: Essential Safety and Security Components

Limit switches have made industrial and electrical engineering applications safe for workers and the environment for a century. And it’s not changing any time soon.

So don’t overlook this small but essential part. And while you’re at it, make sure you take these additional steps before your next OSHA Inspection.

 

What’s New in the SEW Eurodrive Catalog for 2019?

Working in heavy equipment industry means working with some of the most powerful equipment in the world. Every day, heavy industry workers use complex machinery and equipment that can transport, lift, and cut through thousands of tons of material.

Working around that much weight can be dangerous, and making sure your equipment is reliable is the first step in avoiding accidents and high costs.

Using top-of-the-line parts and services for your equipment is an excellent way to get the most out of your equipment, increase profits, and create a safe working environment.

In this article, we’ll go over the SEW Eurodrive Catalogue of products for 2019, which offers some of the most reliable and highest quality parts available.  

SEW Eurodrive Catalogue: Gearmotors

Choosing the right gear motor for your equipment is crucial.

Picking the wrong gearbox can mean less productivity, higher maintenance costs, and a great chance of break downs.

Luckily, SEW Eurodrive has several gear motors available with two new additions to the 2019 catalog: helical-bevel gearboxes and the new ZN..series servo gear motors.

Helical-Bevel Gearmotors

These high torque, low-maintenance helical-bevel gear motors from SEW Eurodrive are high-performance parts.

With a 200 kW power range, high endurance gearing and incredible efficiency, these gear motors are designed to last while giving a top-notch performance. And with a wide range of combination options for gear units and motors, you can be sure that these gear motors are the right choice for any application.

ZN..Series Precision Servo Gearmotors

Able to provide extreme precision at high acceleration torques, the ZN.. series precision servo gear motors can take on several demanding applications. Available in 12 different sizes, there is a gear motor for every application.

The compact yet powerful design of the ZN.. series makes it easy to install, even in tight quarters, and its excellent overload capacity prevents breakdowns and maintenance costs. Whether you’re looking for torque, stiffness or weight, the ZN.. series precision servo gear motor will meet all of your needs.

Gearmotor Accessories

SEW Eurodrive has also added a new gearbox accessory to their catalog this year which can dramatically increase the life of your gear motors.

Integrated Mechanical Brakes

Upon request, you can now have your gear motor delivered with an integrated mechanical brake, available in both single and double brakes.

These brakes come in a large variety of sizes, meaning that you can find the perfect match for your gear motor. It also has a compact design, meaning less installation space and less installation work as well.

SEW Eurodrive also offers an upgrade to these brakes: a functional and wear monitoring diagnostic system. It provides real-time information about the function and wear of each brake, giving you an advantage when it comes to maintaining your equipment.   

Buy Wisely

SEW Eurodrive has definitely stepped things up this year with the introduction of their helical-bevel gear motors, the ZN.. series precision servo gearboxes, and their new brakes.

The most important part of buying new industrial parts is to make sure you’re buying the right part for the right job. To get all the information you need about purchasing industrial parts and SEW Eurodrive’s catalog, please visit our blog.

How to Choose a Clutch That’s Right for Your Machine

In simple terms, a clutch is a mechanical device connected to two or more rotational shafts. When the clutch is engaged, power is transferred from the engine to the wheels.

Choosing the right clutch for your machine is essential in terms of saving you time and money. You cannot afford to have your heavy machinery break down because the clutch isn’t up to the job.

To make the right choice, it helps to know what the different components are and how they work together to affect performance. Keep reading to learn more.

Components of a Clutch

There are several clutch components, the largest parts being:

  • Flywheel
  • Clutch disc
  • Pressure plate

Springs, release levers, covers, bearings, and pins are also used to make up the complete clutch assembly.

The Flywheel

The flywheel stores rotational energy and when the clutch pedal is pressed it provides inertia to allow continuous rotation.

Clutch Disc

This is the part that gets the most wear and tear because it absorbs the load when engaged. There are two types of clutch disc; sprung hub and solid hub.

Pressure Plate

The pressure plate is another hard working part. It forces the clutch disc against the flywheel via springs when the clutch pedal is engaged.

Clutch Disc Material

This part is more likely to wear first, so it makes sense to choose the correct material for the application.

A solid hub clutch disc is primarily used for high capacity engines, such as racing. These hi-performance clutches have heavy-duty springs to absorb the load caused by the higher engine capacity.

Most other applications use a sprung hub clutch disc. It is designed to absorb and spread shock on initial engagement and throughout its use.

Materials used for discs include, organic, Sintered iron and Kevlar. Organic materials are present in most stock clutch discs.

Sintered iron is used for its non-slippage ability.  It can withstand extremely high temperatures, so it’s good for applications that require dynamic stopping. It can also be resurfaced if slippage becomes a problem.

A Kevlar clutch has a higher friction force, but this can result in rougher engagement and some vibration in low gears. That said, it is an incredibly hard-wearing material.

Torque and Response Time

The job of a clutch is to transmit torque without slippage. The heavier the load, the more likely slippage can occur. This is what causes wear and tear.

Response time is how long it takes the load to reach a specified time.

There are several factors affecting torque and response time.

Depending on the application, full torque during acceleration may or may not be needed.

The ability to disperse heat is also crucial and affects every instance of clutch engagement.

Buying a Clutch

Now you know what goes into choosing the right clutch for your machinery. Of course, you want to get it right the very first time.

That’s where we can help. We’re experts in all kinds of industrial clutches. We can advise you on size, torque, style, and application.

If you need to buy a clutch, get in contact today.