Friction Material: What Are Brake Shoes?

Machinery deaths average above 750 deaths a year. Brake shoes are an important part of the safety of many industrial machines, so you can do your part to help lower these statistics by learning about them.

Brake shoes are essential components in many mechanical pieces of equipment used in industrial services. Some of the industries they impact include automotive, agriculture, iron and steel, mining, and rail. In addition, they’re widely used in hoists in these industries and elevators throughout many other sectors.

These parts can wear down over time and should be replaced as soon as possible to ensure the proper working of the equipment. Read on to learn more about brake shoes and how they impact your industry.

What Is a Friction Material?

Brake friction material consists of composites of several different materials that exist as layers used to control the speed of the mechanism they are a part of. These can decelerate the mechanism or bring it to a complete stop. 

Brake pads and linings are usually a mix of 10 to 20 different kinds of raw materials. Choosing the right blend of materials for the suitable condition is complicated by many specialized individual machine needs.

The Blend of Friction Materials

Depending on the specific brake shoe and its usage, the blend of the raw materials can vary. The types of raw materials used can be divided into three types:

Stiffener

This material provides more intensity to the friction material. These can consist of inorganic and organic fibers such as metal and aramid fibers.

Bonding Agent 

The bonding agent hardens raw materials and provides the bonding capability to the materials used in the brake shoes. Usually, phenol resins are the bonding agents in brake shoes.

Friction Adjustment Material 

This material adjusts the friction materials used to make the brake shoes. This allows you to strengthen the stabilization and the effectiveness of the performance of the brake shoes. A mix of raw materials can include lubricants, organic and inorganic fillers, metal powder, and abrasive materials. 

Inspection of Brake Friction Materials

Testing the effectiveness of a brake shoe requires various methods to check the quality. This process includes evaluating the physical properties like the intensity and the hardness of the friction materials in the brakes.

You can also test the chemical composition of these materials to ensure that the brake is safe for operation in an industrial environment. Effectiveness tests also include testing the wear and tear of the brakes, the squeal, and other factors that may affect smooth operation. You can use a dynamometer device to test the brakes. 

Brake Shoes Vs. Brake Pads

Brake pads are flat steel pieces with a thick friction layer on one side. This friction material can vary depending on the type of equipment and the intended use. The main difference between brake shoes and brake pads is the direction of their force.

Brake shoes are the things that carry the brake lining inside the brake drum systems. These are curved pieces of metal with friction material on one side.

Finding a Brake Shoe Replacement

Brake shoes are a crucial part of an industrial machine, as they provide effective slowing and stopping of parts while also providing safety features for the workers operating them. So, having reliable brake shoes is crucial to have a smooth flowing operation.

If you’re looking for brake shoe replacement, feel free to look at our website for your products and if you have any questions regarding our products, feel free to contact us.

Three Tips for Buying Heavy Industrial Equipment

Buying for the heavy equipment industry is different from buying basic supplies. First of all, it’s a much larger investment that will require maintenance to keep your equipment running efficiently. You also can’t return equipment that you’re unsatisfied with after you’ve started using it. 

You need to have a good grasp of what your company needs and whether or not you can afford it. 

What is heavy industry equipment, though? And how do you make sure you’re buying the right ones? Here are three general tips.

1. Mobile Vs. Fixed

How big the industrial equipment you purchase can affect its portability and price. You also have to consider whether or not your business needs to bring its heavy equipment on the road. 

For example, a fixed crane is useful for the heavy construction industry. It can lift heavier objects while remaining stable. As a result, you never have to worry about it moving in the middle of a job. 

Meanwhile, a mobile crane is more compact and can fit into smaller areas. You can use them at multiple job sites since they’re easily relocated. They also require less setup and are often more affordable than fixed ones. 

2. Establish Your Budget

It’s crucial to figure out how much you have to spend before making any serious investments. A tight budget can get in the way of buying new heavy-duty equipment. However, there are some options to get equipment if you don’t have a lot to spend. 

Brand new equipment usually comes with a warranty that provides coverage if something breaks down. However, they’re also expensive. Most retailers offer loans or financing to help customers make payments over time. 

Used equipment is much more affordable than new ones, but they won’t be worth as much later on when you want to resell them. There may also be more options when compared to newer equipment. 

3. Buy What You Need

There’s a new lineup of heavy industry equipment released every year. While it’s surely the best stuff you can find on the market, it’s not necessarily what you need right here and now. So buy what you need. 

Some essential heavy equipment machines for construction include a bulldozer, loader backhoe, and excavator. In addition, cranes are necessary for any vertical job, and dump trucks help haul away all the dirt and debris. 

When buying heavy-duty equipment, always look for machinery that would help improve your workflow or add new capabilities.

The Best Quality Heavy Industry Equipment

When buying heavy industry equipment is essential because it’ll be the equipment you use years from now. You want it to work well without costing your company more than you can afford. 

Kor-Pak offers both OEM and aftermarket parts in dozens of product lines. You can find crane and hoist controls, molded and injection rubber products, and more.

Contact us to hear our entire portfolio or check out our products online. 

 

3 Safety Tips for Working With Electric Cranes

Projections show that global crane shipments will reach more than 35,000 units by 2025.

Electric cranes are generally smaller than most other cranes but present several safety risks due to accidents and improper use. Therefore, keeping injuries to a minimum should be a priority in all applications.

For three practical safety tips for working with electric cranes, keep reading.

1. Conduct Proper Inspections

Like all heavy machinery, you must do daily inspections on electric cranes. In addition, the operator needs to check multiple crane elements to confirm everything is operational and safe to use.

This isn’t just good practice in almost all circumstances but also a legal requirement. Things that should be inspected include the electric crane hoist, rigging gear, upper limit switch, and power disconnect switch.

Several inspections will be essential across the entire industry, but businesses can also implement extra checks if desired. All reviews are needed at the start of every day. If there are alternating shifts or another operator takes over, the new operator may need to do the checks again.

2. Be Aware of Your Surroundings

Anyone operating an electric truck crane should always be vigilant of their working area. If any hazards present themselves, all operations should stop until the hazard is removed. A typical example could be a vehicle driving too close to the crane.

This also applies to anyone else working in the area. You should make sure you keep a safe distance from cranes and all other machinery.

More than a third of crane-related injuries occur due to a load drop, load swing, or unstable load. The odds of a load falling are low but not impossible, and if something requires a crane to lift it, you can be sure that it is very heavy.

3. Regular Maintenance for All Equipment

Electric cranes are solid and durable pieces of equipment but are prone to wear and tear like all machinery. Keeping all parts well maintained and in good condition will prevent the risk of breakdown and help keep everyone safe.

A pickup truck crane with an electric winch has a lot of components, meaning there is a lot that could go wrong.

Mechanical failures such as a chain-breaking could result in a load drop, or the malfunction of any safety features like the power disconnect switch could cause more harm in an emergency.

The maintenance plan of a crane can be based on its use. If an electric crane is only used once a month, it won’t need to be attended as often as one that is in use daily.

The manufacturer of any equipment will be able to provide details of the maintenance needed. This information should be available in the manufacturer’s service manual, but if this is not accessible for whatever reason, they should be able to tell you if you contact them directly.

Working With Electric Cranes

Working with electric cranes requires good practice and responsibility to keep the risk of injury as low as possible.

Kor-Pak Industrial Supply has a wide range of parts for electric cranes and other machinery and can carry out any repairs or replacements needed.

To find out more about our services, click here to contact us today.

 

Wind Power: What Materials Are Used To Make Wind Turbines?

In 2020, wind turbines were the source of roughly 8.4% of total US utility-scale electricity generation.

Yet, the government planned wind energy to be 10% of total electricity generation by 2020. Even though they missed this target, they still plan to generate 20% of the electricity demand using wind energy by 2030.

As wind turbines become more popular, many wonder about how they work. So, let’s dive in and discuss the process of making and using turbines.

How Do Wind Turbines Work?

Wind turbines use the wind to make electricity. The wind turns the wind turbine blades around a rotor. In turn, the rotor spins like a generator and creates electricity. 

Horizontal Wind Turbine

The standard model is the horizontal axis wind turbine which dominates the wind industry. The rotating axis is parallel to the ground. Horizontal wind turbines are advantageous because they produce more electricity from a given amount of wind. 

You will see these wind farms on land and offshore in large bodies of water. While land-based turbines are more cost-effective when placed together, offshore turbines capture vast amounts of energy from powerful ocean winds. 

Further, offshore wind turbines have fewer transportation challenges because they travel on ships rather than roads.

Vertical Wind Turbine

The rotational axis of a vertical wind turbine stands perpendicular to the ground. Some data shows these turbines work well in rough wind conditions. They can generate power from all 360 degrees. Sometimes they can generate power when the wind blows top to bottom too.

Most small wind electric systems and residential wind turbine projects use vertical turbines. They are ideal for unstable weather conditions or areas that aren’t high enough to get steady wind.

While not everyone can have their own wind power, some places are excellent for a distributive system. These include residential, agricultural, and small commercial applications.

Materials For Wind Turbines

Each wind turbine has three main parts: the tower, nacelle, and rotor blades.

A 2015 report from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory states the materials that make wind turbines are:

  • Steel (71-79%)
  • Fiberglass, resin, or plastic (11-16%)
  • Iron or cast iron (5-17%)
  • Copper (1%)
  • Aluminum (0-2%)

Wind turbine manufacturers also use crushed stone, clay, shale, gypsum, and limestone for cement. In addition, each wind turbine tower has concrete with steel to withstand harsh environmental conditions. 

Wind turbines have many components inside the nacelle, like the generator. This section contains mechanical parts. Cobalt, rare Earth oxides, baron, and neodymium are essential materials to manufacture magnets and batteries. 

Additionally, the rotor blades need foams, polymers, and rubbers to help with stiffness.

Explore More About Wind Turbines 

Wind turbines are undoubtedly becoming more important in generating renewable energy. However, manufacturing turbines requires many different materials and processes. Still, their production continues to grow.

If you’re interested in learning more about wind turbines, reach out to us at Kor-Pak Corporation. Our experts can guide you through the components of turbines.

Indexing, Backstopping, and Overrunning Clutches: A Short Guide

Mechanical clutches play a vital role in meeting industrial needs on a large scale. 

Clutches work in power transmission systems where you need to apply torque in one direction of rotation. The use of clutches today protects against backlash and rollover. Professionals divide mechanical clutches into three basic applications. They are indexing, backstop (holdback), and overrunning clutches. 

Keep reading for a short overview of these three mechanical clutches

Indexing Clutches

An indexing clutch turns a shaft one step at a time. The back and forth motion become only one direction of movement. First, the indexing clutch drives in the forward stroke. Then, it spins freely on the return stroke. This accomplishes indexed material feed or a variable speed.

Indexing clutches are typical in manufacturing using material feeders. The clutch can start and stop at set intervals.

Typical applications of indexing clutches include:

  • Assembling machines
  • Indexing tables
  • Metal stamping
  • Packing machines
  • Press working
  • Printing machines

Backstopping Clutches

The freewheel only allows rotation in one direction using a backstopping clutch. As a result, it constantly overruns during operation. The backstop clutch prevents the rotation from moving in the reverse direction. The backstop clutch bearing will automatically engage with a fixed frame when the torque is reversed. 

Backstops can transmit nominal torque mounted on solid shafts. However, if mounted on hollow shafts, the transmittable torque decreases.

Backstop clutches service as a safety measure to protect equipment from damage and ensure worker security. 

Applications that rely on a clutch backstop include:

  • Bucket elevators
  • Fans
  • Gear reducers
  • Incline conveyors
  • Pump systems 

You can also think of a backstopping clutch in a vehicle like a brake. The clutch stops the vehicle from rolling backward. 

Overrunning Clutches 

With an overrunning clutch, most of the time, the clutch spins freely. Overrunning clutches are familiar with two-speed drive applications. The freewheel disengages automatically when the driven member rotates faster than the driving member. 

When the secondary motor drives the machines, the clutch overruns, it switches the speed from low to high. 

Standard applications that use overrunning clutches are:

  • Conveyor belts
  • Creep and starter drives
  • Disengaged centrifugal masses
  • Dual motor or engine drives

Additionally, there are four main types of overrunning clutches. They are ramp & roller, sprag, wedge, and wrap spring. The distinguishing factor between each overrunning clutch is the design and use. 

Clutches for Your Applications

Indexing, backstopping, and overrunning clutches are essential for applications to function correctly. Knowing which clutch suits an application best is even more vital.

Contact us at Kor-Pak Corporation to speak with our professionals about the clutches you need for your applications. Our experts have the industry knowledge to assist you.

Common Types of Equipment Used in the Mining Industry

The United States is the second-largest coal producer, accounting for 17% of the global production. It’s also the leading producer of minerals such as Sulphur, soda ash, and beryllium. The country mines most of these minerals through underground or surface mining methods.

If you’re working in the mining industry, you’ll face many obstacles if you don’t know how to work with different types of mining equipment. The mining machine to use for your excavation will depend on whether you plan to carry out below or above the ground mining.

Blasting Tools

These machines use a calculated force to break down materials to remove the minerals from waste material. Blasting is also essential in removing unnecessary materials that prevent personnel and mining machines from getting the seam that contains the minerals you’re searching for.

The blasting tools are commonly used in open pit and underground mining operations. For a successful mining operation, be sure to implement good blast designs. The problem with poor practices is that they can cause damage to the rock structures leading to unwanted caving.

Dragline Excavator

This equipment is commonly used in strip mining, particularly when extracting coal. However, some miners also use it for tar-sand mining. This excavator features a large bucket attached to chains and wire ropes. The equipment lowers the bucket to the excavated area and drags it across the surface before being lifted by chains.

Keep in mind that two distinct cutting methods are used in dragline excavation. A dragline excavator can cut through the surface of an exposed wall, or it may drag across level ground. The larger machines feature pontoons that walk the machine forward, while smaller excavators feature tread tracks that move across the ground.

Earth Movers

This is among the best mining equipment used in above-ground mining, and they help carry loose earth and soil from one location to another. They are common in large mining projects as they ensure a faster, more practical excavation process.

This large mining equipment will remove waste or overburdened material in most mining sites. This makes it easy to remove the mineral or material of interest and creates a working surface for equipment like haul trucks.

Mining Industry Drills

Most miners use this heavy mining equipment for their underground mining operations. First, they place the drills at strategic positions then the machine digs many feet underground. Such drill holes are used to test whether the ground has sufficient minerals for mining work later on.

If it’s necessary to have miners working underground, this equipment will make space for them. It will even create a safe escape passage.

Streamline Your Mining Operation With Effective Equipment

When working in the mining industry, you’ll need to use different types of equipment. They can even help you accomplish mining tasks with precision if you know how to operate them.

Contact us today to discuss the different options with you.

Industrial Clutches: What Are They and How Do You Use Them?

Experts say the automobile clutch market will reach $13bn by 2026. Yet, while many people are familiar with automotive clutches, there are many different uses for clutches in various industries. 

Marland Clutch is a world leader in the clutch market, with 90 years of history. You can find more than 100 different Marland Clutch products available to buy. 

Keep reading this article to learn more about industrial clutches and their uses. 

What Are Industrial Clutches?

A clutch is a power transmission device. It helps control the speed of movement of a motor. Engines with two rotating shafts use a clutch. The two shafts link the motor to the moving parts of the device.

So, the clutch allows them to move together (couple) or separate from each other (decouple). Separating the shafts disengages a motor’s driveshaft. This enables users to pause an engine without turning it off entirely. 

Because clutches are an integral part of an engine, most mechanical devices use them, from cars to industrial machinery. For example, the clutch stops the connection between the engine and wheels in vehicles. This allows the car to pause or idle without turning off the engine. 

Industrial clutch parts allow a machine to pause while still operating. Often, the clutch pauses the conveyor belt. Clutches make industrial work more efficient. There isn’t wasted time between stopping and starting the motor.

With vastly different uses, there are many varieties of clutches. But, there are a few standard clutch designs available.

PTO Clutch

One typical example is a power take-off (PTO) clutch. Experts recommend PTO clutches for in-line or sideload instruction tasks. Some examples include:

  • Agricultural machinery
  • Road building
  • Rock crushers
  • Wood Chippers
  • Dredges
  • Compressors
  • Pumps
  • Recycling equipment

There are various models of the PTO clutch, depending on its use. For example, some PTO clutch manufacturers don’t use a pilot bearing. This helps to simplify installation and reduces the risk of crankshaft damage.

Power Grip Clutch

 Professionals recommend power grip clutches for in-line or shaft-to-shaft torque transmission. These clutches are an excellent choice for high-inertia loads and heavy-duty industrial operations. 

This is because they can withstand torsional vibrations and heavy shock. Power grip clutches also give machinery a smooth start.

They minimize release drags, which helps create a reliable and long-lasting performance.

Low Inertial High Torque Clutch

One final example is the low inertial high torque clutch. Again, the name implies a high torque to size ratio and low rotating inertia.

Experts use this heavy-duty clutch for industrial operations with high-cycle power transmission and controlled acceleration. Some examples include:

  • Petroleum
  • Material handling equipment
  • Power generation
  • Metal forming industries
  • Steel shear
  • Yarders 
  • Fail-safe brakes
  • Marine winches

Users mount the clutch to the end of the shafts. It is reliable and has a high-speed response rate.

Learn More About Industrial Clutches 

Industrial clutches are much more common than most people think. Yet, they are essential to keep machines operating at maximum capacity with less maintenance.  

Contact us at Kor-Pak Corporation to get expert advice on the best clutches for your applications. Our professionals will help improve your uptime and load efficiency.

A Quick Guide To Understanding All the Basics Concerning Friction Materials

Recent polls show that nearly 40% of tractor-trailer owners use disc brakes in their vehicles. Brake calipers are an essential part of a vehicle’s disc braking system, and a vehicle would be unable to stop without them in place. But how do they work, and what do they do?

Read this brake calipers guide for an overview of how brake calipers work and some brake calipers tips to get you started!

How Do Brake Calipers Work? 

What are brake calipers? Industrial brake calipers are a vital part of a disc brake system. Disc brakes are frequently used in machines and industrial vehicles but are not always as common as other types of braking systems.

These little calipers are usually attached to the front wheels of trucks and other vehicles, although many manufacturers have begun installing disc brakes on the rear wheels as well. This means that each rear wheel will also have a rear brake caliper to go along with it.

But how does it work? As you press on a brake pedal, hydraulic fluid passes through the lines and pushes a piston. This piston, in turn, closes the brake calipers. 

The brake calipers are attached to brake pads, which are the braking parts. As the calipers close, the brake pads press against the wheel’s rotor and apply friction. This friction slows the wheels down, slowing and eventually stopping the vehicle.

Disc brake systems are typically external and vented, allowing air to cool the system from all the heat generated by the friction. This keeps the system functioning far longer without wearing out, which is one of the many reasons disc brakes are the better choice.

Brake calipers need to be properly set to squeeze at the right time and apply the right amount of pressure with the brake pads. Thankfully, you can adjust the calipers and caliper piston with a brake caliper tool, no matter which type of industrial vehicle you’re working on.

Two Types of Calipers

Calipers for disc brakes are either fixed calipers or floating calipers. As a result, they perform differently, although the underlying braking concept is still the same.

Floating calipers move closer or farther away from the rotor. When hydraulic fluid presses the piston, the entire caliper moves with it, pushing the brake pads against the rotor.

As you might guess, fixed calipers don’t move. Instead, pistons push them closed, pressing the brake pads against both sides of the rotor. These brake calipers are generally the better, higher-quality option, but they are also more expensive.

What About Other Brakes?

There are other braking systems found in trucks and other industrial vehicles. However, these systems don’t use calipers to press brake pads against rotors as disc brake systems do. 

Drum brakes are common braking systems and have been in use for quite a few decades. Although they aren’t as good as disc brakes, they still see quite a lot of use. 

The “S” cam brake is a drum brake system that is extremely common in trucks and larger industrial vehicles. It functions well, but it isn’t as good as a disc brake system at stopping a vehicle quickly. 

Learn More About Brake Parts!

While this is a general overview of brake calipers, there’s still a lot more to brakes and braking systems! We want you to feel confident in all your knowledge and materials regarding industrial brakes.

So feel free to contact us with questions or concerns! Our goal is to provide you with the best materials, knowledge, and advice possible, whether for brakes or other industrial products.

The better you feel about your equipment, the happier we are!

How Do Brake Calipers Work? A Complete Guide

Recent polls show that nearly 40% of tractor-trailer owners use disc brakes in their vehicles. Brake calipers are an essential part of a vehicle’s disc braking system, and a vehicle would be unable to stop without them in place. But how do they work, and what do they do?

Read this brake calipers guide for an overview of how brake calipers work and some brake calipers tips to get you started!

How Do Brake Calipers Work? 

What are brake calipers? Industrial brake calipers are a vital part of a disc brake system. Disc brakes are frequently used in machines and industrial vehicles but are not always as common as other types of braking systems.

These little calipers are usually attached to the front wheels of trucks and other vehicles, although many manufacturers have begun installing disc brakes on the rear wheels as well. This means that each rear wheel will also have a rear brake caliper to go along with it.

But how does it work? As you press on a brake pedal, hydraulic fluid passes through the lines and pushes a piston. This piston, in turn, closes the brake calipers. 

The brake calipers are attached to brake pads, which are the braking parts. As the calipers close, the brake pads press against the wheel’s rotor and apply friction. This friction slows the wheels down, slowing and eventually stopping the vehicle.

Disc brake systems are typically external and vented, allowing air to cool the system from all the heat generated by the friction. This keeps the system functioning far longer without wearing out, which is one of the many reasons disc brakes are the better choice.

Brake calipers need to be properly set to squeeze at the right time and apply the right amount of pressure with the brake pads. Thankfully, you can adjust the calipers and caliper piston with a brake caliper tool, no matter which type of industrial vehicle you’re working on.

Two Types of Calipers

Calipers for disc brakes are either fixed calipers or floating calipers. As a result, they perform differently, although the underlying braking concept is still the same.

Floating calipers move closer or farther away from the rotor. When hydraulic fluid presses the piston, the entire caliper moves with it, pushing the brake pads against the rotor.

As you might guess, fixed calipers don’t move. Instead, pistons push them closed, pressing the brake pads against both sides of the rotor. These brake calipers are generally the better, higher-quality option, but they are also more expensive.

What About Other Brakes?

There are other braking systems found in trucks and other industrial vehicles. However, these systems don’t use calipers to press brake pads against rotors as disc brake systems do. 

Drum brakes are common braking systems and have been in use for quite a few decades. Although they aren’t as good as disc brakes, they still see quite a lot of use. 

The “S” cam brake is a drum brake system that is extremely common in trucks and larger industrial vehicles. It functions well, but it isn’t as good as a disc brake system at stopping a vehicle quickly. 

Learn More About Brake Parts!

While this is a general overview of brake calipers, there’s still a lot more to brakes and braking systems! We want you to feel confident in all your knowledge and materials regarding industrial brakes.

So feel free to contact us with questions or concerns! Our goal is to provide you with the best materials, knowledge, and advice possible, whether for brakes or other industrial products.

The better you feel about your equipment, the happier we are!

 

How Does a Disc Brake Work? A Complete Guide

Long considered the best option in braking technology, disc brakes are frequently used in many industrial machines. But how exactly do they work?

Read on for an overview of how a disc brake works and some disk brake tips for buying disk brakes. 

Anatomy of a Disc Brake

There are three main components of a disc brake. These are the brake pads, the rotor, and the caliper. In addition, other components work with these three parts to ensure the disc brakes work correctly.

Other components include the piston that connects with the caliper, the hydraulic system for the brakes, and the wheel itself that the brakes are working to stop.

Your disc brakes guide will probably show that your brakes are vented. Most of these brakes are vented to help keep the braking system cool. Sets of vanes pump air through the disk, making sure things don’t overheat or wear out.

How Do They Work?

When the brake is pushed on a machine, it pushes hydraulic brake fluid through lines to the brakes. The fluid moves pistons, which then close the calipers.

These calipers attach to the brake pads, and when they squeeze shut, the brake pads then press against the rotor. This creates a lot of heat and friction, slowing the machine down or stopping it completely. However, as opposed to other types of brakes, disc brakes wear down evenly across their surface, which means you won’t have to replace them until the entire brake pad is worn out.

Because of this, brake pads are designed to handle that excessive heat and friction while still providing enough friction themselves to stop the machine. They are made of various friction materials, depending on the type of brakes and the purpose of the job.

Buying, Repairing and Replacing Disc Brakes

Disc brakes are not always the go-to brake system in industrial machines, but they’re increasingly used in factory settings. The good news is you can order brake parts and have them installed on your machine with little difficulty. In the same way, you can order replacement parts if your pads wear down or your brakes wear out.

Choosing disc brakes is easy because there are so many high-quality industrial disc brakes and brake manufacturers to pick from. Some firms specialize in brakes for oil, gas, and energy industry machines, while others focus on transport and hauling machinery. You can look at different companies to see what sizes and types of disc brakes they specialize in and determine which style would work best for your situation. 

Learn More About Brakes and Brake Parts

Getting a new type of disc brake for your industrial equipment is a great idea, but you don’t have to figure it all out on your own. We’d love to help you decide what kind of brake system works best for you.

So if you have any questions, contact us! We’ll be happy to help you figure out precisely what type of brakes you want, how to get them, and how to install them on your machines. We want you to have the best brakes possible.