5 Signs You Need Crane Repairs

Has your crane been acting unusual? That’s most likely a sign that it’s time for crane repairs.

If your crane is vital to everyday operations, you’ll need to recognize the signs early to make sure everything keeps running smoothly.

OSHA sets the standards for crane safety, and a crane that isn’t working properly is a hazard to employees and clients.

Every business should have strict safety standards and a checklist for inspecting crane and hoist systems.

But even if you’ve been in the business for years, it’s easy for little things to slip through the cracks and cause safety hazards. And a damaged crane isn’t always easy to spot.

To make your life easier, we’ve compiled 5 of the most common signs your crane needs repairs. Keep an eye out for them!

1. Corrosion or Rusted Parts

If you’re working outdoors (particularly in humid or rainy climates) keep an eye out for corrosion. Rust is the most common type of damage caused by corrosion, and it can be detrimental to your equipment.

Rusted parts can often go unnoticed because rusting occurs over longer periods of time. It’s important to keep an eye out for, however, because once parts are rusted they can easily break.

2. Abrasion

Like corrosion, abrasion is dangerous because it occurs over a long period of time and can really sneak up on your equipment.

If you’re not familiar with the term, abrasion occurs when parts scrape away at each other after years of movement.

To avoid breakages, keep a close eye on all moving parts of your cranes.

3. Broken Chains

Years of lifting heavy loads can take a toll on your equipment, especially the chain links. Broken or worn out chains are a serious safety hazard and can compromise your whole crane system.

If you see a worn out or broken chain, stop work immediately and have the chain repaired.

4. Broken or Loose Parts

This may seem obvious, but broken or loose parts should be a sign you need crane repairs immediately.

To prevent damages, make sure you’re thoroughly inspecting your cranes often. It’s easy to notice damages to large parts of cranes, but it’s the smaller parts that often go unnoticed

Loose parts can also sneak up on you. It might be obvious when something is broken, but a loose part could go unnoticed until it slips out.

Make sure you are inspecting and tightening all parts of your machines as often as possible.

5. Worn-out Pads

You probably know that your cranes have multiple pads to absorb shock from movement. While these parts help prevent wear and tear on your machines, they themselves can wear out over time. To prevent more serious damage, keep an eye on the pads of your crane and replace before they get too worn out.

Prevent Crane Repairs Before They’re Necessary

The best way to prevent dropped loads, expensive damage or injury to your workers is to be proactive and catch these issues early. Make sure your employees are up to date on safety standards and that they report every issue, no matter how small.

Are you in need of crane repairs or an upgrade all together? Check out our crane services here or contact us for more information on how we can help.

5 Crucial Tips for Buying a Used Demag Crane

5 Crucial Tips for Buying a Used Demag Crane

Are you in the market for a used Demag crane?

There are many different things to consider before buying a crucial piece of equipment, and a Demag crane is just that.

Damage is always a great choice, as they’re one of the highest quality brands out there. Even if you’re buying used, you’re guaranteed to get a top-notch piece of equipment.

However, a new-to-you crane is always a big purchase so you’ll want to make sure you get a good deal. To make the most of your money, here are five things you always need to consider when buying a used Demag crane:

1. Establish a budget

With any major purchase, it’s important to crunch your numbers beforehand and establish a finite budget for yourself.

Determining what you can spend will make your life easier down the road, as you determine what features and other qualities you look for in a crane.

So, know exactly what you can spend and start your search from there. Used cranes are a great way to save some extra money without sacrificing quality.

2. Why do you need the crane?

Another thing to establish before you invest in a new crane is why you need it in the first place.

If this crane is a new addition, or you’re replacing a broken crane, this one might be obvious. However, if you’re old crane is lacking some important features, make sure you’re looking for those in the new purchase.

3. Identify your must-have features

Establishing why you need the crane should give you a good idea of your must-have features. When doing this, make sure you’re aware of how the crane will be used, as well as the working environment.

Are you lifting loads many stories high? Are you lifting many loads or a few heavy ones? Does the crane have the freedom to move around or is space more limited?

Thinking through a detailed list like this will help you make a list of requirements.

4. Create a “wish list” of other features

Before you start looking, it’s also a good idea to establish the difference between features that are good to have and features that are nice to have.

These features won’t be a dealbreaker for you, but they could be worth investing in. In this case, it’s important to focus on the features that are truly important, so you can potentially save your business even more money in the long run.

5. Shop around for the best deal

As with any big purchase, don’t buy the first thing you see. A crane is a large investment piece, so it’s important to make sure you’re making an informed purchase.

Buying used Demag crane is a great way to save money, but always make sure they’re in good condition and up to safety standards.

If you haven’t done so already, take some time to look over the Demag website to familiarize yourself with their cranes and other products. This will give you a better understanding of what you’re looking for.

For more resources on making your new or used crane work best for you, check out the other articles on our blog. And if you would like expert help in choosing a Demag crane that meets your needs, get in touch.

5 Signs You Need Crane Repairs

Has your crane been acting unusual? That’s most likely a sign that it’s time for crane repairs.

If your crane is vital to everyday operations, you’ll need to recognize the signs early to make sure everything keeps running smoothly.

OSHA sets the standards for crane safety, and a crane that isn’t working properly is a hazard to employees and clients.

Every business should have strict safety standards and a checklist for inspecting crane and hoist systems.

But even if you’ve been in the business for years, it’s easy for little things to slip through the cracks and cause safety hazards. And a damaged crane isn’t always easy to spot.

To make your life easier, we’ve compiled 5 of the most common signs your crane needs repairs. Keep an eye out for them!

1. Corrosion or Rusted Parts

If you’re working outdoors (particularly in humid or rainy climates) keep an eye out for corrosion. Rust is the most common type of damage caused by corrosion, and it can be detrimental to your equipment.

Rusted parts can often go unnoticed because rusting occurs over longer periods of time. It’s important to keep an eye out for, however, because once parts are rusted they can easily break.

2. Abrasion

Like corrosion, abrasion is dangerous because it occurs over a long period of time and can really sneak up on your equipment.

If you’re not familiar with the term, abrasion occurs when parts scrape away at each other after years of movement.

To avoid breakages, keep a close eye on all moving parts of your cranes.

3. Broken Chains

Years of lifting heavy loads can take a toll on your equipment, especially the chain links. Broken or worn out chains are a serious safety hazard and can compromise your whole crane system.

If you see a worn out or broken chain, stop work immediately and have the chain repaired.

4. Broken or Loose Parts

This may seem obvious, but broken or loose parts should be a sign you need crane repairs immediately.

To prevent damages, make sure you’re thoroughly inspecting your cranes often. It’s easy to notice damages to large parts of cranes, but it’s the smaller parts that often go unnoticed

Loose parts can also sneak up on you. It might be obvious when something is broken, but a loose part could go unnoticed until it slips out.

Make sure you are inspecting and tightening all parts of your machines as often as possible.

5. Worn-out Pads

You probably know that your cranes have multiple pads to absorb shock from movement. While these parts help prevent wear and tear on your machines, they themselves can wear out over time. To prevent more serious damage, keep an eye on the pads of your crane and replace before they get too worn out.

Prevent Crane Repairs Before They’re Necessary

The best way to prevent dropped loads, expensive damage or injury to your workers is to be proactive and catch these issues early. Make sure your employees are up to date on safety standards and that they report every issue, no matter how small.

Are you in need of crane repairs or an upgrade all together? Check out our crane services here or contact us for more information on how we can help.

5 Safety And Maintenance Tips For Your Crane’s Chain Hoist

5 Safety And Maintenance Tips For Your Crane’s Chain Hoist

Performing regular maintenance is an essential safety practice in any workplace. This is especially true in a place that deals with industrial equipment, like cranes.

Cranes are both extremely useful, and extremely dangerous. According to OSHA, crane-related injuries kill approximately 71 workers each year.

Maintaining your crane’s chain hoist is essential to keeping your employees safe. Additionally, regular maintenance will also keep your crane operating efficiently.

1. Understand Common Chain Hoist Problems

The first step to maintaining your chain hoist on your crane is understanding how it works. This way, you’ll be better able to identify when wear and tear are impacting its effectiveness.

There are three kinds of hoists that your crane might use: differential, lever ratchet, and hand chain. All three of these hoists use some combination of a chain and hook to both lift and move heavy objects.

Since these hoists work by rotating a chain, the most common problem associated with them are related to wear and tear on the chain.

That said, regular maintenance can greatly extend the lifespan of a chain.

2. Keep the Chain Clean and Lubricated

The most common causes of wear on a chain are rust and debris. Chains can become stiff and difficult to move due to the buildup of rust and grit.

Most hoists will require dismantling in order to be properly cleaned and oiled. You should do this at least once or twice a year, depending on what you primarily use the hoist for.

3. Watch out for Signs of Damage

Over time, the chain in a hoist will become worn. Make sure to look for signs of deterioration, and replace the chain before it is overused.

Common signs of a chain that needs to be replaced include kinking and stretching. Additionally, if chains “pop” when they are in use, that is likely because they are becoming too stiff.

Remember, it’s always better to replace a chain than it is to have an accident.

4. Perform Regular Inspections

Testing and inspecting your industrial equipment is not just a good idea. OSHA requires that certain tests and inspections take place on a regular basis.

The hoist operator should perform a brief, visual inspection every day to make sure the equipment is operating properly.

Monthly, a more in-depth inspection should be done to document an existing wear, tear, and damage to the equipment.

5. Conduct Necessary Testing

In addition to inspecting your crane’s chain hoist, you should also test it regularly to ensure it is functioning properly.

You should perform a service load test at least quarterly. These tests are designed to observe how well the equipment functions while lifting objects of various weights.

Finally, at least every six moths, make sure to test the chain hoist’s ability to lift heavy loads.

Performing these tests will help demonstrate how the hoist operates under various conditions and will reveal any problems with performance.

If you’d like help keeping your equipment in good condition, or need to purchase replacement parts, then contact us. We’ll work with you to find the right equipment and tools for your needs.

Which Type Of Overhead Hoist Is Right For You?

Figuring out the right overhead hoist for your crane can be a mind-boggling experience. Navigating the vocabulary and the specifications for each type of hoist is confusing and frustrating.

However, depending on what it is you’re lifting, it’s possible to find the best overhead hoist for you!

Read on to take deeper dive at the specifications for different overhead hoists.

Which Type of Overhead Hoist Works for You?

Manual or electric?

The first decision to make is whether you’d prefer an electric or manual overhead hoist. To decide, take a look at what you intend to use it for.

If you’re using maintenance equipment, or you don’t anticipate using the hoist frequently, a manual hoist will be fine. There’s no reason to go through the expenses of using an electric hoist for such infrequent use.

Electric hoists are better suited for light equipment that needs more lifting. They can also come in various different speeds depending on what you need to use it for.

Electric hoists also offer smooth starts and stops along with the hoist motions. Load sway is limited, meaning wear and tear are generally reduced. Additionally, it also gives you more accuracy and precise loading.

Lifting medium

A lifting medium refers to what the lift actually uses to, well, lift! This can be wire rope or chain.

Some lifting medium hoists are a welded link load chain. This is exactly what it sounds like: different interwoven welded links. They’re manufactured to meet different recommendations and strength, meaning you may need a different hoist for different lifts.

You can also use a roller chain load, which you will have to interchange, and a wire rope.

Operation

An operation host refers to the amount of power needed to operate it. You can use manual power, electric power, or pneumatic.

Manual power will give you a hand chain, meaning you’ll be grabbing and pulling a long chain that’s suspended from the hoist.

If you use an electric one, you won’t have to pull. Instead, you’ll use a menu of buttons and levers to help you lift the object.

See above for more information regarding electric and manual hoists.

Pneumatic powered hoists are powered by a control device. You press a button or pull a lever that will help give energy to an air motor. This will help the object lift.

Suspension

This refers to the type of mounting used to suspend your hoist. They can be hook-mounted, lug-mounted, and trolley-mounted.

All of them are exactly as described. You’d use a hook-mounted suspension to suspend your hoist from a hook, a lug-mounted suspension to suspend it from a lug, and a trolley-mounted suspension to suspend from a trolley.

Conclusion

As you can see, not every overhead hoist will work for every job. Most of them are limited by manufacturer specifications and weight, among other things.

Having a variety of hoists is probably the best solution, but the one you choose and your method is a personal decision.

If you have any questions regarding hoists or industrial equipment, feel free to let us know!

How Often You Need to Have Crane Inspections

Overhead cranes are integral to construction sites.

Cranes are responsible for moving heavy, large objects from one location to another.

What’s more, they perform the duties that other material handling machinery cannot.

So, crane inspections should be a basic maintenance procedure. After all, it ensures onsite health and safety, whilst helping to meet deadlines.

What is the Difference Between Frequent and Periodic Inspections?

The OSHA 1910.179 puts inspections into two categories:

  • Frequent
  • Periodic

Frequent

Every site has a responsibility to make daily checks to ensure crane safety, such as:

  • Hooks
  • Hoists
  • Wire ropes
  • Functional operational mechanisms

These checks are usually made by the crane operator.

Periodic

Periodic checks will take place at different points through the year.

For example, you will have to perform:

  • Normal service (annual basis)
  • Heavy service (semi-annually)
  • Severe service (quarterly)

The severe service checks will identify performance during arduous weather conditions or corrosive environments.

Why Do You Need Crane Inspections?

Serious and fatal injuries can occur if you fail to make regular overhead crane inspections.

Sadly, 4,379 private sector workers died at work in 2015, with 21% of fatalities in construction.

That is approximately 1 in 5 deaths.

Many lost their lives due to a fatal fall, electrocution, caught in machinery or from a falling object.

Injuries that can all happen when a crane is in operation.

Every site has an obligation to both its employees and the public to check its machinery.

Here are the four biggest reasons why you must inspect the crane:

  • It is a legal requirement
  • Human safety
  • Liability
  • Machinery reliability

It is imperative you have cranes inspected by trained, qualified inspectors.

As a result, you can maintain a safe, lawful and productive environment.

So, it is vital crane safety becomes a site’s top focus.

What are the Inspection Requirements?

Every site has a responsibility to make inspections on all machinery.

Cranes installed after August 31, 1971, must also meet ANSI/ASME specifications.

Cranes can pass an inspection even if they received modification. A qualified engineer/manufacturer must check the modified structure suits the re-rated load.

If it doesn’t, it will not pass the inspection.

Every site must mark the rated load on each side of the crane. You must also show the rating for each hoist.

You will not pass an inspection if the walkways compromise health and safety.

If you have a parallel crane, it’s vital to have a clearance between the two bridges.

It is also important to note that only designated personnel should operate a crane.

Conclusion

There is nothing more important than the lives of your employees and the public.

Every site has a legal and moral obligation to embark with regular crane inspections.

You should also aim to provide staff with health and safety training. This will help to create a safe workplace environment for all.

Never operate a crane without ensuring it is fit for purpose. Plus, ensure it is only reviewed by a qualified inspector.

Have you had any experience with any crane inspection issues? Got any advice to share? Write a comment below.

5 Things You Must Know About Crane Brakes

If your business uses a crane regularly it’s important for the safety of your customers, employees, and equipment that you understand the components that make up your tools.

As with all of your machinery, cranes have unique requirements for operation and maintenance.

For safe operation, no part is more important than crane brakes for protecting your people and assets.

Let’s make sure you know the ins and outs of crane brakes.

Here we go:

1. OSHA Requires Inspections for Crane Brakes

In addition to a thorough inspection that needs to take place whenever any repair occurs that might affect safety systems, OSHA requires regular inspections as standard procedure. 

2. Daily Inspections

In addition to regular inspections, OSHA requires daily inspections.

Operators are required to perform daily visual inspections of crane braking systems when used for construction. Should any deficiency be noted, it must be:

  • Assessed for safety
  • Taken offline if deemed unsafe
  • Repaired according to manufacturer guidelines
  • Inspected for proper completion of remedial action

Safe operations of your crane demand regular inspection. Even if employed for uses other than construction, the emergency brake needs to always be operational.

3. Different Brake Types

OSHA also requires that all cranes have two brake systems, a holding brake, and a control brake.

Both are essential to safe operations.

  • A Holding Brake holds a load to ensure safe operations. Even in the event of a power outage, a holding brake will hold the load.
  • A Control Brake controls the descent of the load. They slow the speed.

4. Overload Is Still an Issue

Too many owners and operators believe that since an emergency, or holding brake, is standard on all cranes, there are no issues of overload.

But improper loads, overuse, and deferred maintenance can damage your equipment and cause unsafe conditions.

5. Preventative Maintenance

Because of the OHSA regulations requiring inspection, too many industrial concerns defer maintenance of their crane brakes. Worse, if used for non-construction applications, they defer inspections too.

Waiting for an issue to crop up during a visual inspection or unrelated repair is waiting for the worst to happen.

Your manufacturer recommendations will provide valuable guidelines for the overall preventative maintenance of your crane.

Although your crane may be essential to daily operations, it’s important it is dependable and safe. In some cases, you may want to perform PM tasks more regularly if your crane is in heavy use.

This investment will improve the longevity of your equipment and reduce downtime.

Part of Your Overall Safe Operations

Your brake maintenance and troubleshooting efforts should be incorporated into standard operations. If your engineers and operators know what to look for you will save on accidents and cost.

And, as OSHA requirements demand the crane be taken offline with any issues, you will also be avoiding costly and unnecessary downtime.

Brakes are only a small part of an operations plan though. Putting it all together means getting trusted support and advice every step of the way.

Kor-Pak serves numerous industries, including steel, rail, energy (wind), mining, and oil. At Kor-Pak, we keep industries productive.

Our customers are important to us. Don’t wait to see how we can help with every aspect of your operations plan.

Contact us now and discover how Kor-Pak can help bring value to your business today.

Cranes

5 Signs It’s Time for Crane Modernization and Upgrades

5 Signs It’s Time for Crane Modernization and Upgrades

Safe use of a crane is an absolute necessity for many businesses and industrial concerns. Without the lifting power and transport capabilities of a crane, your operations can grind to a halt.

Unfortunately, many businesses wait too long to act on crane modernization. They see the expense as too costly to justify.

But the truth is if you don’t update your important equipment and machinery the costs are impossible to recover. Beyond tragic safety issues, you will be risking the loss of your competitive edge.

If crane use is important to your business it’s important to know when to update or upgrade your equipment.

Let’s find out when it’s time. Here we go:

1. Daily Inspections Reveal Deficiencies

Because OSHA requires your crane to have a daily visual inspection prior to operations, any deficiency can take it offline.

And, until the deficiency is remedied and deemed safe by a designee, your company will be losing productivity.

If daily inspections are frequently taking your crane offline it is time to consider an investment.

2. Performance Is Lagging

There have been many upgrades to crane technology over the years. If your crane is older, it may not have the benefit of the newest technology.

Modernizing your crane doesn’t always mean replacing the asset. An upgrade effort could include installing new software, drives, or controls.

3. You Need More Capacity

If your crane is not handling the loads you would like, it can cost man hours and significant energy costs making extra loads. A modernization effort can help increase capacity.

Your crane will be operating more efficiently.

4. Your Control is Suffering

With an upgrade, you can install radio and infrared controls in your crane. Enhancing control means more efficient performance.

And more efficiency means cost savings through investment.

5. Crane Modernization and Cost Benefit Analysis

In a thorough preventative or predictive maintenance program, crane modernization should never be a surprise capital expense. The asset is necessary to your business, and its efficient operation requires maintenance.

A thorough cost-benefit analysis (CBA) will reveal when it’s time to modernize your equipment. Don’t wait for costly downtime and unnecessary repairs.

Updating your equipment should be part of a well-thought-out process. Using a template for a CBA will help you analyze when it’s time to upgrade or update.

Rather than risk expensive and ineffective repairs, unsafe operation, and significant downtime, updating your crane should show a payoff timeline.

Integrating your crane update into your tax planning and capital improvement plan will help every facet of your business as well.

An Integrated Operations Plan

Just like your cranes are essential for operations, so is all of your industrial equipment. A great integrated strategy means considering the value of all of your machinery and assets to your customers, owners, and employees.

The right equipment means you are invaluable to industry. At Kor-Pak we help our customers boost value and deliver more money to their bottom line.

Kor-Pak serves numerous industries, including steel, rail, energy (wind), mining, and oil. At Kor-Pak, we keep industries productive.

Our customers are important to us. Don’t wait to see how we can help with every aspect of your operations plan.

Contact us now and discover how Kor-Pak can help bring value to your business today.

Two crane's baskets against clear sky. Lifters in blue and yellow

Why You Need to Be Doing Regular Crane Maintenance

Why You Need to Be Doing Regular Crane Maintenance

Are you doing your best to keep your workers safe?

Regular crane maintenance is crucial for the safety of your employees. Like any large machine, a crane can wear down after a while.

Since cranes move very heavy objects, there are many parts that wear down quickly. This can cause materials to drop unexpectedly, and it puts your workers in danger.

There are many types of cranes out there, including wall cranes, gantry, semi-gantry, etc. However, all of them are exposed to the same risks.

If you want to find out more about crane maintenance, read on. We crafted a mini guide on what parts are more susceptible to risks and how often you need to check your crane.

The crane parts that are at high risk and daily inspections

They are a couple of daily inspections that you could do yourself to ensure the safety of your working site.

Some of the most important inspections that should be done daily are:

  • Look for maladjustments in the operating mechanisms.
  • Check the hydraulic and pneumatic parts for intense deterioration and leakage.
  • Look for cracks, crevices, and deformation in the hooks.
  • Look for any damage in the chains.

Safety concerns

Accidents provoked by faulty cranes are quite costly when it comes to equipment, materials, and injuries to your employees. You will also have to face the OSHA fines for not investing in your crane maintenance.

On top of the direct costs and the OSHA fines, you will also have to face the lawsuits from property owners and the families of your workers who have been injured.

Most of the time, these tragic events happen simply because the work personnel is not educated properly in handling cranes. Also, a lack of crane maintenance is also to blame.

One of the first steps you can take to improve the safety of your workers is to hire certified crane operators. Someone who does not know what they are doing when handling a crane could cause a lot of damage financially and ruin human lives.

How crane maintenance has changed over the years

An annual inspection is only the tip of the iceberg. Some inspections should be done daily while others periodically, such as electrical components, load indicators, brakes, etc.

Why has crane maintenance changed?

In the past cranes were made out of a strong alloy that was more resistant to heavier weights and mishandling.

Today, the materials used are not that strong and they cannot be abused as much as their older counterparts. Not to mention that many cranes, even the older ones, suffer from working decades in extreme temperatures. This can cause the cranes to lose structural strength and provoke a lot of damage.

Make sure a crane never lifts a heavier load than recommended.

Wrapping up

Ensuring the safety of the machines you are working with saves you not only money, but it can save lives too.

Make sure your workers are trained properly and are well aware of the risks of mishandling and abusing a crane.

If you want to find out more about crane maintenance, do not hesitate to check our blog. If you have any questions, feel free to contact us

crane hoist selection

How to Pick the Right Crane Hoist

crane hoist selectionAny job working with heavy equipment demands only the very best in parts and supplies. Sourcing less than quality parts could cost people their lives.

This sentiment applies especially to cranes. Choosing the correct crane hoist can make or break your job site.

Hoists come in many different varieties, and you need to know what will work best for your situation.

To make sure disaster never strikes your job site, we’re bringing you our guide on how to pick the right crane hoist.

What’s a Crane Hoist, Exactly?

Most people get the general concept behind a hoist, but don’t know what they’re actually all about.

Yes, hoists move things up and down. That’s the very basic concept; moving something heavy from one place to the next.

However, hoists vary widely in size and application. What you’d use in your garage isn’t the same as what you’d use on a job site.

Since we’re talking about cranes, our focus is on electronic and air powered chain hoists.

Chain hoists give crane operators the strength they need to move heavy objects, often in high danger situations.

They also specialize in vertical lift, resisting grime, are portable, and modular.

Today, we’ll touch on the two main types of chain hoists and why they’re the perfect choice for your next crane hoist.

Electric Chain Hoist

Electric chain hoists work well for lifting large objects in small spaces. That definition isn’t pretty, but it’s true.

The electric motors provide operators with extreme accuracy without sacrificing lifting power or capacity.

If you choose an electric crane hoist, remember to specify what voltage your crane can handle. Mismatching voltages won’t allow your hoist to work with your crane.

Air Powered Chain Hoist

Air powered hoists are the strongest of the heavy lifting chain hoists. Whatever you throw at them, they’ll lift and move.

These hoists are specifically for faster, longer, and more intensive lifting. Their air powered nature also makes them practical where electricity may pose safety hazards (near water).

However, air hoists do require an air compressor. This means extra equipment brought on site, and extra money.

Choosing Your Crane Hoist

Choosing the correct hoist for your crane depends solely on the work you’ll undertake. Every environment is different, and so the correct hoist varies.

We recommend talking to your hoist supplier to get their opinion on the matter. They’ve heard all manner of situations and likely have insight into your unique circumstances.

Before we end our guide, there is one more crane hoist option we should mention. When chain hoists can’t bear your load, wire rope hoists are the answer.

Large cranes commonly used on construction sites are prime candidates for the wire rope hoist.

Choosing the correct crane hoist is vital to the success and safety of your job site. Don’t bet on a hunch when there are lives on the line.

Use our guide to make the correct decision for your next crane hoist. Don’t forget to contact us if you need any help.